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Thread: Scavengers new furnace build!!!

  1. #41
    Senior Member Voyeurger's Avatar
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    Great solution Justin. Beautiful furnace. Try to keep it clean now. Great hole saw too. I knew the blanket wouldn't hang on it. Don't try coring through a carpet with it though. Hang city.
    I was disappointed you used the tin snips though. Oh, the drill was for masonry. I get it. Well, that's one beautiful hole man. And the saw? That's a hundred year saw.
    Badass all around. Way to go dude.
    Gary
    "If you're ever traveling through time, and you see yourself coming from the other direction, DO NOT make eye contact."

  2. #42
    Senior Member 4cylndrfury's Avatar
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    I was thinking though, may be worth it to smear some refractory onto the exposed wool in the tuyere...free fibers and silicosis and whatnot...

  3. #43
    Thanks Gary! You are right; it is a hundred year saw. It will be taking up space in my drawer for the next 100 years!

    4CF, I thought about that, but I am out of refractory for the time being. I do have some stove patch moarter though.... It will not get hot back there so I will smear a little on there and hope for the best.

    It was a week ago today I did all my mad dashing to gather supplies and progress has been made.

    As suggested I added a stopper to my lifting tongs. It was as simple as picking up a scrap piece of angle iron, drilling a 1/2" hole in the angle and welding it to the handle. I capped the opposite pipe handle to give the bolt something to push against. With this the bolt is adjustable.





    Here is the crucible suspended with only the weight of the crucible keeping the tongs locked down.



    I also finished up the pouring shank. There was a lot of welding on the shank and tongs!





    The only thing left to do is attach the lid to my lifting mechanism. That will not take too long to do. I did not feel like moving the welder outside last night. (my leads are too short)

    I just mainly cleand up the shop but nobody wants to see pictures of that.

    This evening I may try to throw together a couple more flasks and mix up another 100 lbs of greensand. I have so many parts I need to get poured. Some are already sold with checks in the mail! That is the best kind of part to make.

    Monday I hope to get back around a computer to post the results. My dad is FINALLY getting cataract surgery done on Monday, so yall don't worry if I am unable to log in and post! Gotta keep my foundry grunt in good shape!

    Justin

  4. #44
    Well how was everybody's weekend? Good I hope. Mine was fine.

    Okay, I will cut the crap. First firing, melting cast iron using the new a-35 crucible!



    I already got onto the old man for having his visor partially up. He is from the "old school" where safety gear is for sissies. The heat from this pour has him using all his protective gear now. Funny how pain can be a great behavior modifier.

    More coming in the next post.

    Justin

  5. #45


    Well, we did pretty well for the first pour. One the plus side we fired up at 6:00 on Saturday evening (I had many problems through the day and also did an aluminum pour earlierin the day.) We pourd cast iron at 7:22. I kept a log of progress but I forgot to bring it to work to copy. We did not have the crucible full. It was about 80% full when we poured. Basically in the same time as we were meling 26 lbs, we are melting over 60! And much of that time was spent getting aquainted with the new furnace.







    I reused the Kwiky I threw together, but I did take it apart and adjust it and tighten it. It made a difference. We only used about 3 1/2 gallons of oil which is the same as we were using with the smaller crucible and furnace. I was able to turn it DOWN from where I was running it before and my compressor is cycling on and off.

    So basically our melt time is the same as is our oil consumption. The only thing that has increased is the capacity!

    The inslated firebrick and fireblanket are a huge improvement. The furnace held up very well and looks set for many melts.

    BUT.... We did have some problems. When I opend the furance lid for the crucible pull, the extreme heat melted my oil and air lines. You can see the radiant heat reflecting onto the ground in the video. This was quickly remedied by moving the oil tank way back next to the shop and burying all new oil and air lines. I will get pictures of this. It is a huge work space increase and it makes things look better. So that mishap is solved and done.

    My one fear was the lid. I was hoping to get several melts out of it before it failed. It failed on the first melt and completly gave up half way through the second melt. The refractory started popping and spalling the second I turned on the propane. It was cured, so I do not believe it was a water issue.



    I had this ready just in case. It is my LECA base for my other furnace I built. It is failing but at a much slower rate. It is handy to have around just in case.



    Our second pour was on Sunday and we spent close to 4 hours just molding. And we still did not have to fill up the big a-35.

    We are getting good, machinable cast iron. I need many more flasks, more sand, and a bigger shop!

    So I wish this was where I could say this was a great end to the thread, but there is more to come. I had 4 80 lb bags of Greencast 94 plus given to me when I started this venture last year and I have used it all up. While it is rated at 3400 degrees and costs $155 a bag, it has not held up at all. I can't find any information on it. So I am thinking this refractory is not good for a hydrocarbon flame furance. When all else fails, fresh tactics.

    I need a fail resistant lid. Gypsy mentioned a domed lid and I have seen some with good designs. My question to all of you.... What have you used for your lids? Any pictures? Type of refractory used? Any suggestions? I hope to have a plan ready to execute by the weekend and I want to use it next weekend.

    Justin

  6. #46
    Senior Member 4cylndrfury's Avatar
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    Justin - awesome awesome stuff...I love the burried lines idea...my foundry must remain mobile for now, but that is a really great idea for when the time comes I can permanentally set up my furnace.

    Also, its great to hear the level of efficiency you were able to achieve with this set up...KUDOS!

    With regards to the lid, I think just a couple pie shaped IFB friction fit into a heavy steel band (a la your leca base/lid you posted) would last quite a while.

  7. #47
    Senior Member Essej's Avatar
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    Good stuff Justin... but where's the pic of you pulling the #35 crucible? That's what I want to see!

    I second 4CF's suggestion on the lid.

  8. #48
    Jesse, is the video link in post 44 showing up? I kinda had my hands full when we were pulling the crucible so I got my wife to video it.

    So I have 2 votes for IFB. Easy and fast. Like me.

    Justin
    Last edited by indiscriminate scavenger; 01-29-2013 at 04:43 PM.

  9. #49
    Senior Member Essej's Avatar
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    Jesse, is the video link in post 44 showing up? I kinda had my hands full when we were pulling the crucible so I got my wife to video it.
    Ahhhh, there we go I didn't realize it was a video... thought it was just a pic...

    Looks like your new tools work very nicely. You and your old man worked together very nicely too... definitely want to be on the same page with that monster pot!

  10. #50
    The tools worked great. Some adjustment is needed on the shank handle releases. I have watched that video 20 times and I keep seeing things I did wrong or could improve upon.

    We built and got used to using the a-12 crucible and tools, so this was a scaled up version of what we are used to. We do need to get together a little better. This was our first pour with the new crucible and tools. With 60 lbs of metal, 22 lbs of crucible and 35 lbs of tongs there is some weight coming out of the furnace! Perfectly managable, but make it 2600 degrees and it adds a whole new level!

    I can't wait to pour again with a full capacity pour (77 lbs). I am looking around at the possibilities and we have to start thinking bigger projects! I want to do a bell in the near future and possibly a cannon. I also need an arbor press, and a ring roller... Oh and a belt grinder. And don't forget my muller... Need a better muller. It is a visious cycle.

    Justin

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