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Thread: what did you do in your foundry today?

  1. #4611
    Senior Member Tobho Mott's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jammer View Post
    I'll have to give my wife credit for the yard. The rule was, put whatever you want in the garage, but nothing goes outside, PERIOD. Now I'm glad for that rule.
    LOL, Mine made me get rid of my outdoor fridge and stove a couple years back... Place looks halfway respectable now! I did manage to keep the sheet metal oven drawer and its racks & spiral elements though. Those elements made OK grates for my charcoal furnace, but they fell apart after only a couple of uses each.

    Shoveled out my melt/pour area yesterday after work so I could access the shed where I keep my furnace in hopes of getting a 2nd chance at pouring a couple of failed (lost foam) castings I poured on the last snow-free day we had for XMas gifts tonight or tomorrow. I had one of them come out OK, but the second pour from the second melt was short, and for one pattern I think I let up on pouring a bit too soon, hard to say through all the foam-smoke and flame, but the sprue was mostly collapsed when I dug it up... Lost foam with no coatings is great because you can use very fine sand to get a nice finish and be carving foam one minute then pouring an hour later, but it is not the most reliable method.

    Woke up today to a raging blizzard, of course... It has stopped though, so I'll be out there shovelling again later today. I still think I can pull it off, but I'm prepared to spend Saturday enduring the crunch at the mall if need be.

    Jeff
    Tobho had learned to work Valyrian steel at the forges of Qohor as a boy. Only a man who knew the spells could take old weapons and forge them anew.

    How I built my oil furnace | My Photo Album | My Videos

  2. #4612
    Yesterday I worked on a matchplate for some small castings I needed to make to fulfill an order. The customer needed 30 of these so I thought the extra time making the matchplate was worth it.

    IMG_2211.jpgIMG_2198 (2).jpgIMG_2204.jpgIMG_2209.jpg

    First I poured the matchplate. After the matchplate cooled, I started making castings from it. I needed to make a few tweaks to the pattern to ensure clean draws, but I was able to get quite a few poured while I made adjustments. Now that the matchplate is dialed in, I should be able to bang out the rest of the castings much faster.

  3. #4613
    Senior Member Robert's Avatar
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    Very nice work! How are you threading those?
    Robert
    "Whether you think that you can, or that you can't, you are usually right."
    - Henry Ford (1863-1947)

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  4. #4614
    Quote Originally Posted by Robert View Post
    Very nice work! How are you threading those?
    Robert
    For this particular job I'm just using hand dies. These are just being threaded to standard NPT sizes. I sized the matchplate to accommodate for shrinkage/contraction and can thread the castings after removing all the flash, without any additional machining. The hand dies don't really take that long, if your set up and your doing the castings in batches.

  5. #4615
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    Sorry Junkyard but I'm going to have to ask for complete shop pics. The iron apparatus to the right of your molding bench caught my eye. What is it...?
    FLAME ON...!!!!

  6. #4616
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    Your molding bench looks like a pretty good setup. I like the saddle style tool bucket. How are you utilizing the compressed air? I can't really tell where the lines go from the picture.

    Pete

  7. #4617
    Quote Originally Posted by J. Vibert View Post
    Sorry Junkyard but I'm going to have to ask for complete shop pics. The iron apparatus to the right of your molding bench caught my eye. What is it...?
    The piece of equipment you are seeing is one of two Osborn Jolt/Squeeze machines that I have here in the foundry area. Please see the photos below.

    IMG_2317.jpgIMG_2316.jpg

    I bought two of these, one being a parts machine, the other I managed to get into good working order. Recently I was able to get the second machine running with some parts scavenged from another obsolete foundry. I now have two working machines, which is really helpful but not necessary. For anyone who has ever seen or used these, I am sure they will attest that they save you a lot of time and labor. They are very simple machines, with few moving parts, and are dead simple to work on. Mine are mobile and on wheels which helps a lot, but their footprint is very small. If you are doing any type of production runs, these machines are well worth investing in if you can find them. As a side note, I have the original parts diagram and equipment manuals for these machines in pdf format should anyone need them. Parts for these machines are still available through EMI or other foundry suppliers.

    Here is a few more shop photos since you asked....

    IMG_2314.jpgIMG_2315.jpgIMG_2318.jpgIMG_2321.jpg

    You can see the molding area, mulling and finishing/sanding equipment, and my primary furnace. I have a few other larger furnaces, but I would say that 80-90% of my work can be handled with the smaller furnace.
    ...Dave...

  8. #4618
    Quote Originally Posted by Petee716 View Post
    Your molding bench looks like a pretty good setup. I like the saddle style tool bucket. How are you utilizing the compressed air? I can't really tell where the lines go from the picture.

    Pete
    IMG_2312.jpg

    Hopefully the photo helps a clear things up a little. I have a limited space to work, so everything in the shop is mobile. The incoming compressed air (red hose) feeds a manifold that is temporarily attached to the molding bench with two beam clamps. The manifold is basically a tee that feeds a pressure regulator, and a knee valve. The regulator feeds my compressed air gun. I limit the pressure to prevent damage to the molds when I am blowing any loose sand before closing the mold. The knee valve feeds the pneumatic vibrator that I use when I am working with matchplates on the bench. The knee valve allows me to keep both hands on the flask while I am drawing the pattern out. The knee valve is the same style that is used on my jolt squeeze machines, and is used in the same way. You can see the pneumatic vibrator sitting (disconnected) on top of the knee valve in the photo.
    ...Dave...

  9. #4619
    Junkyard, if you don't mind sharing I would appreciate the PDF of your Osbourn. Helen at EMI couldn't help with the parts for my Tabor Turbo and my google search didn't turn up anything. I fixed my jolt cylinder with piston rings, but the squeeze seal is weak and only acts when it feels like it. It is leather and probably dried out. It has been a long time since I had it apart and do not remember the shape, but thought I could convert to something like a quad ring or even just a large "O" ring.
    Nice match plate. I am thinking that my next step for the Indian domes should be a cast matchplate.

    I'll mention again Raspers' caution about putting unique and interesting posts here. They are lost even to the search algo's.
    If you think you can't do it, you're right!

  10. #4620
    Senior Member Tobho Mott's Avatar
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    Gave these to my parents (their grandparents) as gifts this morning. The blue insulation styrofoam patterns were milled out on my drill press using a couple different drill and dremel bits after I ran the digital photos through a "pop art" website that converted them to a 3- colour image and glued printouts to the foam.

    I have given out portrait plaques like this once or twice before, it's fun to watch the recipient looking at them for a moment not recognizing the image from up close, then realizing what they are looking at like it is one of those magic eye posters...

    Hope everyone has a safe and happy holiday!



    Jeff
    Tobho had learned to work Valyrian steel at the forges of Qohor as a boy. Only a man who knew the spells could take old weapons and forge them anew.

    How I built my oil furnace | My Photo Album | My Videos

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