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Thread: Engine Repair Help (Toro S200)

  1. #1

    Engine Repair Help (Toro S200)

    Ok, a while back I posted a thread about trying to repair a small 2 stroke engine here http://www.alloyavenue.com/vb/showth...ne-Repair-Help To sum it up, I know it gets fuel, and has spark. I went back and tested the compression, and it only gets about 90 lbs of compression, is that too low for a small 2 stroke? The engine is from an old Toro S200 snowblower, per the title.

    EDIT: I thought I should add that after several frustrating minutes of trying to turn the engine over, I noticed little puffs of fuel/air mixture coming out of the end of the exhaust pipe, which led to several more fruitless minutes of pulling on the starter cord.
    Last edited by Smithboy; 02-09-2012 at 02:41 AM.
    Well OBVIOUSLY, you don't know how we do things around here!

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by Smithboy View Post
    EDIT: I thought I should add that after several frustrating minutes of trying to turn the engine over, I noticed little puffs of fuel/air mixture coming out of the end of the exhaust pipe, which led to several more fruitless minutes of pulling on the starter cord.
    That sounds like several summers of my youth after my folks got a Toro lawn mower. You probably don't want my suggestion for it. But I wish you luck.
    Where are the donuts?

  3. #3
    Try some starting fluid, it will start up first pull. U can get it at most gas stations, it is an aerosol can. Ace hardware, basically anywhere l. Just follow the instructions.
    "a dream without a plan is nothing but a fantasy"
    BYMC Google map
    i live in the chicago near west subs, hoping somebody else does too!

  4. #4
    You can even use the spray can form of WD-40 as a starting fluid.

    It sounds like it's trying to run. You say it has spark, but how strong is it? Those magneto's can sometimes get week after a while. A week mag will still spark when the plug is out of the head and grounded to the side of the block, but is it a good solid sounding "crack" when it goes off?

    Try starting it in the dark. You might also have a high voltage leak to some other form of ground (you should be able to see it in the dark). That would steal some of the energy heading to the plug.

    Just my two cents.

    P.S. I wish I had a snow blower!

  5. #5
    Ops! Sorry, I didn't read the other post...

  6. #6
    Yes, adding to the voltage leak, I have a motorized bike that seemed to have a coil or magneto failure while riding. It would give a pop every few turns, but no go. I knew I couldn't fix the coil, so I swapped the magneto for a spare I had. Then hot glued everything, suspecting water got in from snow riding. Took me a whole city block of bump staring to get it started, and it ran like crap. As I rode it for a few minutes to warm up, I heard a clicking sound. That told me there was a spark jumping somewhere. I get off the bike, look and see sparks jumping all over the spark plug! The insulation had cracked. Replace spark plug, and its fixed. If it has been sitting, it is most likely a Carb issue. Start fluid will tell you if the spark is good, and if it stops running quickly after starting then it is the Carb for sure. Now go get some start fluid!
    "a dream without a plan is nothing but a fantasy"
    BYMC Google map
    i live in the chicago near west subs, hoping somebody else does too!

  7. #7
    Wait, one more thing! I had some trouble getting my neighbors mower started, got spark and ran with start fluid. Guy at ace hardware told me to dump the gas and put in fresh gas. Ran like a champ! Always dump gas before long storage.
    "a dream without a plan is nothing but a fantasy"
    BYMC Google map
    i live in the chicago near west subs, hoping somebody else does too!

  8. #8
    One thing to keep in mind with 2 stroke engines, even though you have compression you might not have crank case pressure. Like broken reeds or blown seals.....definitely, try fresh fuel mixed properly too.

  9. #9
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    Before I became interested in foundry I only knew 1 way to melt aluminum. Spray ether (starting fluid) into a small engine. I've used straight gasoline as starting fluid in a 2stroke but even that is pretty hot for little pistons. Carb may need to be rebuilt. Unless you can find the model of engine you'll only be able to guess at the fuel/oil ratio. Record any numbers you can find on it and look up tehcumseh online and see if any number combos look familiar.
    Pete

  10. #10
    DavidF's idea of checking the reeds is a good one. I had a chainsaw I struggled with for a while that had some leaking reeds. I cut out some new ones from some stainless shim stock, and the thing ran great!

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