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Thread: glazing crucibles??

  1. #1
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    glazing crucibles??

    i saved my pennys and bought 2 kg of delft clay, yah yah i know one every minuet. i have a question about this :
    "You will need to glaze your crucible with borax before you melt any metal in it. This ensures that your metal doesn't stick to the ceramic crucible."
    from this page, and yes i did buy one of these:
    http://www.fdjtool.com/ProductInfo.a...oductid=22.791

    any thoughts on what this means? i hope some one knows what they intend. I think i am supposed to melt a bunch of borax in the thing before i use it for metal. I hope they mean the publex type of borax because that's all i have.
    If you are not having fun, you are not doing it right.

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  2. #2
    Ckick the borax link on that page Cx...

    Line the crucible to protect the metal from any impurities. Heat your curcible to red hot and sprinkle on the borax while turning the crucible to line the crucible.
    w3

  3. #3
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    i saw that w3 but i don't really understand what it means. other than they what to sell their special powder.
    If you are not having fun, you are not doing it right.

    Truth comes in two formats: enlightenment and collisions with reality.

  4. #4
    Administrator Site Admin Anon's Avatar
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    Borax is borax, and it's much cheaper in the laundry aisle than from a casting supply store.

    And glazing a crucible with borax makes sense if you're casting precious metals, because a skin of gold stuck to the inside of your crucible is worth a lot more than the crucible is. It doesn't make sense if you're casting cheap metal where the crucible is the most valuable thing, because adding flux to the inside of it will flux it and reduce its life.
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  5. #5
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    Thanks Anon i think you addressed all of my issues with this.
    If you are not having fun, you are not doing it right.

    Truth comes in two formats: enlightenment and collisions with reality.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Anon
    Borax is borax, and it's much cheaper in the laundry aisle than from a casting supply store.
    I agree with Anon on that, them boxes at the store are well over 1lb, think I paid maybe $2.00 for it,
    I have only used the stuff when forge welding, I bought it 4 years ago and havent put much of a dent in the box, I think I filled a 16 ounce plastic soda bottle and have almost used that, but then again I havent done any forge welding in the last 2 years either,


    Ron
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  7. #7
    The borax from the casting supply store probably (hopefully) has far less water in it.
    Meaning that it's a very little bit easier to use as it doesn't fluff up as much when heated.

    You can melt all your "laundry" borax in the same matter as you would prepare a salt flux and pour it in a thin dish.
    Smash it up (careful, it might be very sharp) and store in an airtight container to keep it dry.
    It's better to know something about everything then to know everything about something.
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