Page 1 of 9 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 85

Thread: Home furnace burner unit for a foundry

  1. #1
    Senior Member 4cylndrfury's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Cincinnati, Ohio, USA
    Posts
    3,638
    Blog Entries
    1

    Home furnace burner unit for a foundry

    A lot of people are converting from fuel oil to electric or natural gas for heating their homes. Im pretty sure theres a tax credit for doing this. So several weeks ago, I called a little heating and air conditioning place near me asking if they had recently removed any working oil burner units from a home furnace. I was told they didnít have any at that time, but I could call back every several days and they would let me know when they had something. Well yesterday I got a hit. Im not too sure if what I have will work, but its worth a shot. Heres a few pics...

    This is the blower/pump motor. The shaft held the squirrel cage, and also extended outside of the housing to power the pump:


    Here is the pump, Im most excited to have this, Having this pump means I dont have to use a pressure tank and compressor...now what to do with those scuba tanks?



    Im going to push the oil through the pump, through a hard line with some sot of heater element wrappped around it for a pre heat, and through a .5 GPH, 70į, semihollow cone delevan nozzle. I will use a different blower to supply combustion air as the blower housing on this unit is toast.

    and heres the technical details retreived from the various components. The "≈" symbol means I HAVE NO FREAKIN IDEA what that means

    Burner Overview:
    MFR: Beckett
    Model: AFG series oil burner - DU201
    Flowrate: .5-1.1 gph
    ≈Head: F3
    ≈STC PLT: 3-3/8U
    Pump Pressure: 100psi
    ≈LFRB: 3708

    Pump/Blower Motor
    1/7 HP
    3450 RPM
    ≈1.0 SF
    115v
    2amps
    60Hz
    single phase, non reversable

    Fuel Pump
    MFR: Webster
    model: 49205-15 or M34DJ-3 (cant tell)
    Single stage
    3450 RPM
    designed for no.2 fuel oil (kerosene?)
    ≈728N


    Anyway, this motor has sat outside in the rain for a few days, so Im not sure if it will function or not. Im gonna give it a chance to dry out until friday before I try to power it up. Heres my issue though, theres only 2 wires in the cord. How do you ground a motor if theres no ground wire supplied from the factory? I think it was grounded into the main burner body which probably had a ground wire installed by the factory. Thats my guess. This thing was pretty mangled when I got a hold of it. I do know the pump functions, which is the essential part. The pump shaft spins freely, and when I spun it by hand, it spat a little oil at me. If I need to I can power this thing with an old vacuum motor and a multiplying pulley .

    more details to come...

  2. #2
    First of all put it all back together.

    Change the nozzle to a Delavan .75 80A or Hago .75 80H, I find this to be a good size for an average furnace. It also seems to be possible to free-air fire using these. a .6 or a .8 will work as well, the flow rate of the nozzle isn't too critical when just seeing if it works as long as it is within the burner's firing range.

    Hook it up to a supply of fuel. It doesn't take much, many of these are removed with enough of a squirt of fuel in them still to throw a flame on the test bench. Though you took yours apart first, so it will need some fuel supplied. They are designed for a 50-50 Kerosene/Diesel mix, known as #1 Fuel Oil. However, the exact oil grade doesn't matter as long as it is clean to avoid jamming the pump or damaging the nozzle.

    The two wires on the motor are of course your hot and common, the motor and ignition transformer should be wired in parallel to the supply leads, and if you have a honeywell relay present you should use it to prevent an explosion if you flame out.

    For grounding, there is usually an exposed bolt or lug on the frame that you can use to attach the ground wire to the frame of the burner. That's sufficient for these, as the motor and burner frame will be sufficiently coupled mechanically to be grounded as one piece.

    It's especially important if you have a working ignition transformer that the ground is connected, as the transformers are center-ground so a short on the high tension side will usually pop a circuit breaker, but if not grounded correctly could kill somebody.
    The only difference between being a genius and being insane is being right.

    My Oil Burner

    Want a site of your own to document your foundry adventure?

  3. #3
    Senior Member 4cylndrfury's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Cincinnati, Ohio, USA
    Posts
    3,638
    Blog Entries
    1
    ideally I would have just retrieved a functioning burner unit, however, that is not the case, the transformer unit was severely burned up, the case was burned badly and the interior had literally been on fire at one point. The furnace guy said the motor worked before they removed it, but the controller was toast. The housing was bent and the sheet metal was ripped. Im not sure what happened to this unit, but it was in pretty bad shape. Theres no putting this thing back together. Thats why I need to figure out how to ground this thing. I need the motor to power the pump.

  4. #4
    Okay. It sounds like it had a backfire problem that toasted it. Mine is known to do that from time to time if I try to shut down without turning the fuel off first- burning fuel drips down inside the gun and damages the wiring for the ignitor. I killed a transformer that way too, it shorted out the electrode wires after the insulation burned through.

    I would assume in that case then the honeywell control and flame eye are burned beyond repair. go ahead and remove them entirely, they're trash if they don't work.

    The motor requires 120V typically 15A supply to run. Ground can be dervived anywhere you can get a clean contact on the burner or motor frame.

    As long as the seals in the pump are okay, and the gun assembly is all there (except maybe the ignition electrodes, since they're useless without a transformer to power them), you can still use it. Or just use the pump and motor, and build your own gun head for it.

    On mine, which lacks the safety relay anyway due to it's age, I just put a bolt through the side of the housing where it wouldn't interfere with anything and attached my ground to that.

    Without an ignition transformer you will need a piece of sheet metal to cover the hole left in the frame by the missing transformer, and a way to ignite this without getting your fingers near the flame because when it ignites it will remove hair.

    Also on the specs in your first post, ≈ is approximately.

    Meaning you have a Beckett type AFG (I want to trade my Generaal Electric for one of these, they're good working units)

    Flowrate is pretty obvious, I recommend a .75 GPH nozzle with a 80 degree angle for a furnace with an 8" bore.

    STC/PLT, and LFRB don't mean anything anymore, they're engineering values only used when trying to design a home heating furnace. For metalworking, all that matters is that it makes a hot clean fire of sufficient power.

    head is just the type of turbolator and gun layout it uses. It doesn't matter much, just use what you got.

    Pump pressure is good to know. Mine is also designed for 100 PSI, but I've been able to get it as high as 120 PSI and have fired as low as 80 PSI.

    As for the fuel type, #1 fuel oil is kerosene/Diesel 50-50 for use in cold weather so it doesn't gel up at 40 degrees.

    #2 fuel oil is pure diesel, it turns to slush at 40 degrees F and clog things up.

    I doubt it will object to WVO as long as it doesn't have chunks of food in it. A good filter will protect the pump and make the nozzles last longer, although mine has survived thus far with minimal filtering.
    The only difference between being a genius and being insane is being right.

    My Oil Burner

    Want a site of your own to document your foundry adventure?

  5. #5
    Senior Member 4cylndrfury's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Cincinnati, Ohio, USA
    Posts
    3,638
    Blog Entries
    1
    So I have a problem. I was going to mount the Delevan nozzle I have into a 6" or so pipe nipple. so I could pre-heat the oil with a nichrome wire, and it would also tolerate higher heat near the burner inlet of the furnace. The problem is the thread on a delavan nozzle is not NPT - this was verified by a pipe fitting specialist.

    Heres my dilemma: Should I just braze the nozzle into a length of copper pipe? Can I hose clamp it into some air supply hose and hope the combination of a blower and oil flowing thru keeps the rubber line cool enough to avoid damage from radiant heat? Is there an off the shelf way to fit the nozzle into a "wand"?

  6. #6
    The nozzle is not NPT by any means.

    However, the small fuel line from the pump to the nozzle socket is. Most pumps are ported for 1/8" NPT, and use 1/4" flare fittings to make the connections to the nozzle. Tap that high pressure line and you should be good to go without having to worry about heat affecting the pump.

    How much of the burner did you get? Usually when people pick up a used one they get the whole thing, all the necessary pieces included. There should be a brass socket that fit inside the burner gun assembly to hold the nozzle.
    The only difference between being a genius and being insane is being right.

    My Oil Burner

    Want a site of your own to document your foundry adventure?

  7. #7
    Senior Member 4cylndrfury's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Cincinnati, Ohio, USA
    Posts
    3,638
    Blog Entries
    1
    Yeah, i was afraid i would be shooting myself in the foot a bit. The assembly came as you see it in the pics. There wasnt a socket for the nozzle included. I think im going to try to solder it into some copper pipe, unless theres a chance that a air hose will survive the radiant heat with a blower passing cool air over it and cool oil passing through it. But i think thats a pretty tall order for rubber hose...

  8. #8
    That does sound like a bit much.

    I think the nozzle sockets are only a few dollars on ebay, or you could try soldering a nozzle into a suitably sized pipe. It might work, as the nozzle won't get hot enough to melt the solder without clogging up anyway from coking the oil.
    The only difference between being a genius and being insane is being right.

    My Oil Burner

    Want a site of your own to document your foundry adventure?

  9. #9
    I would braze it into a close nipple or brass fitting that it will slide into. That way you can take it apart still to clean it.

    w3

  10. #10
    Or just call the service place back in a few days and see if they have taken out any other oil furnaces. maby if they have a complete furnace you could end up with a insulated fire pot also, and all of the controls.
    Charlie Tuna
    BYMC Google map

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •