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Thread: Improving your alloys

  1. #11
    Senior Member Robert's Avatar
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    Machining cast Al

    I usually machine parts of my castings on a lathe or mill. They do not machine well, especially with a carbide tool. HSS seems better. Is there anyway to improve this thru the use of flux or other additives? How is the 6061 barstock I am familiar with different? I seem to get short broken chips instead of continuous. The material also seems more porus. Do I need to de-gas it? If so how? I did not see a thread about this.

  2. #12
    Administrator Site Admin Anon's Avatar
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    I've observed the same effect. A sharp carbide tool plus lubricant is my solution, but the "consistency" is definitely different than for extruded stuff, and the chips tend to be much shorter and more brittle. I strongly suspect that it has to do with temper, not compositional changes, so annealing the casting should make it machine more like an extrusion. I've never gotten around to trying it.

    If you're getting visible porosity, it's time to degas. There is plenty of info here, it just takes some looking.

    A search on "degassing" yielded a useful thread here.
    The process of turning stumbling blocks into stepping stones can at times require the use of a large sledgehammer.

    Foundry Tutorial
    My Website <<Now at prometheus-foundry.com

  3. #13
    You should steal this for your book Anon.
    Yes it needs a stickly.
    Heat them up, mold them out.

  4. #14
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    Wow! That was awesome reading. Can you get Tim to let you add this to the book PLEASE!

  5. #15
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    I stumbled on a little blurb in a material magazine somebody has been forcing on me for the last year that lead me to this: A corrosion resistant paintable cast aluminum alloy with some unique properties. Anybody use it yet?

    http://www.mdwtech.com/kalloy/index.html

    I was sure there was a topic on Master Alloy but I couldn't find it :roll: so I put it here. One of those post ya don't wanna lose
    Angus MacGyver a.k.a Clifford C. Claven, Jr.

  6. #16
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    look up up the patent and see whats in it.
    If you are not having fun, you are not doing it right.

    Truth comes in two formats: enlightenment and collisions with reality.

  7. #17

    Japanese Alloys

    for those that are interested in the more exotic alloys
    often with a percentage of precious metal, or simply "tuned" to produce a certain color with a certain patina recipe.

    Introduction to Japanese Alloys > Ganoksin

    employing those terms as search queries will eventually lead you to Ford Hallam
    http://followingtheironbrush.blogspot.com/
    A South African modern practitioner with close ties to Japan, and IMO the best source in English. To further the dissemination of these skills he started a forum
    http://followingtheironbrush.org/index.php, which is very international in scope, comprised of a great many gifted metalsmiths, jewelers and sculptors.


    traditional Japanese metalworking relies on a combination of alloys, patinas and inlay techniques to supply the color range to "paint" in metal. (Dragonfly Fugue by Ford > Picasa slideshow)

    Obviously manufacturing these alloys is typically on a quite small scale.
    Further, most of the time the alloys are cast but the artwork itself is wrought and inlayed.

    Ive posted this link to another forum which is typically a NO-NO not to promote it. But rather because the language divide in researching Japanese Alloys is so great as to be nearly insurmountable without a command of Japanese and searching with Kanji on Japanese websites. Romanized Japanese search terms are of limited value and would invariably lead you to Ford Hallam anyway.

    Ganoksin provides the 2nd best English online resource Ive found.
    Japanese Patinas Index
    and exotic alloys in general (Jewelry based)
    http://www.ganoksin.com/borisat/dire...ry/subject/3/1

  8. #18
    A separate line of investigation Ive undertaken regards alloys suitable for enameling, or more accurately enamels suitable for use on metal

    the second part isn't within the scope of this thread, but the other way round would include this link.

    http://www.ganoksin.com/borisat/nena..._enameling.htm

    matching up the coefficient of thermal expansion between a metal and a glass is quite challenging.


    BTW that link has a rather nice graph of the Solidus Curves for Copper/Zinc and Copper/Tin alloys (temperature vs the percentage of the second metal)

  9. #19
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    Ice Czar every time you post a bunch of links i lose half a day or worse half a night. Thanks for sharing, i am enriched.

    but hold it down to one a day, i need my sleep.

    cx
    If you are not having fun, you are not doing it right.

    Truth comes in two formats: enlightenment and collisions with reality.

  10. #20
    I think I'm going to have to just bookmark Ice Czar's name. :P
    Heat them up, mold them out.

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