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Thread: Repaired Monster maul

  1. #1
    Senior Member evlwht-guy's Avatar
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    Repaired Monster maul

    You will forgive me if I'm feeling pretty pleased with myself over breaking a tool but I managed to break my monster Maul while splitting wood. I've had this thing for like 25 years and in the winter we heat entirely a 3300 SQ foot house with a fireplace insert, so I expect I probably just wore it down over the years. The steel pipe handle cracked just as it goes into a second steel pipe which is then welded to the monster Maul head. It's an obvious place for this type of a crack since all the stresses are concentrated there. I put it in my shop press straighten it out and then welded it. Took maybe 25 minutes to fix. That is after I got through it admiring my rippling muscular self image and showing it to my neighbor.

    Photo 1 shows the bend in the handle due to the crack, photo two shows the crack, photo 3 shows me pressing it flat and photo four is the completed weld.

    1 2 3 4

  2. #2
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    What? No photo of the rippling muscular torso?
    So, whats your Plan B?

  3. #3
    Senior Member Tobho Mott's Avatar
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    That's a whole 'nother forum you're thinking of there, 12bolts.

    Good job Evl!

    Jeff
    Tobho had learned to work Valyrian steel at the forges of Qohor as a boy. Only a man who knew the spells could take old weapons and forge them anew.

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  4. #4
    Senior Member evlwht-guy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 12bolts View Post
    What? No photo of the rippling muscular torso?
    one has to be careful showing photos like that, others may become jealous.....or fall over laughing and hurt themselves.

  5. #5
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    Middle age manboobs Not my cup of tea. Maul, press, and vise? Right up my alley!

    Pete

  6. #6
    Senior Member Wolfcreek-Steve's Avatar
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    About 30 years ago, I got in a situation where a friend of a friend was going through some tough times and needed help with her fire wood supply for the winter. Husband was in the late stages of lung cancer, no back up heat in their home, no money for a new furnace, etc. When we got to their home, there was a large load of hardwood pulp, a couple guys with chainsaws, and folks of various sizes and skills and the lady of the house splitting the chainsawed blocks with a maul like the one here. Amazingly, she was pretty much keeping up to the 2 guys cutting blocks. We must have processed close to 10 full cords of wood that day and I'll bet she split more than half of it by herself. At 35, I was in pretty good shape, but couldn't begin to keep up to her.
    She might have had rippling abs, but she was as wide as she was high and by the way she could swing that maul, I wasn't going to get close enough to look for abs. LOL
    What is that squeaking noise?

  7. #7
    Senior Member TRYPHON974's Avatar
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    First time I see something like this. I'm not that familiar with cutting wood though. We've got a tool, like an ax you can hit with a sledgehammer, it's called a "Merlin", maybe some kind of cousin of this tool.
    I don't like breaking tools, but what's better than fixing a tool you broke?
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  8. #8
    Senior Member evlwht-guy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TRYPHON974 View Post
    First time I see something like this. I'm not that familiar with cutting wood though. We've got a tool, like an ax you can hit with a sledgehammer, it's called a "Merlin", maybe some kind of cousin of this tool.
    I don't like breaking tools, but what's better than fixing a tool you broke?
    I think you are talking about a splitting maul. Lots of people hit them with sledgehammers but the flat end is really supposed to be used to hit a wedge as it is hardened. Anyway.....here is a photo of me with a very overloaded truck full of red oak. The wife and I were able to take the entire tree in 2 loads.....we did have to drive home at 30 MPH on the second load. Notice I have 2 sledge hammers. one is a standard 8lb the second is a 12 lb. the 12 pound one I got last year and is really good when you have big knots. I wish I had bought one years ago. although the technique of using it took some getting used to.

    [url=https://flic.kr/p/24riEWY]

  9. #9
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    This reminds me of my teenage years - cutting firewood in the spring and splitting and stacking it in the summer. We kept probably two and half cords of split red oak on hand all the time. The best days were when the step father rented the hydraulic log splitter to take to the woods with us and we'd come home with a trailer load of split wood, rather than a trailer load of blisters and broken handles. That said, I've split a lot of oak!
    "Success is 99% determination"

  10. #10
    Senior Member Wolfcreek-Steve's Avatar
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    Oak is easy, try granite! I worked for a mason for awhile, we often would go to a gravel pit and split boulders for stone veneer on houses. (12 lb. stone mall) The shock coming back up the handle would rip callouses right off your hands. Leather gloves helped, tough work for tough men. I quit and enrolled in tech school and learned to be a machinist, never looked back.
    What is that squeaking noise?

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