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Thread: Welding up a Lead Pot

  1. #11
    Senior Member TRYPHON974's Avatar
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    I welded several steel crucibles to melt aluminum . I stick welded as it was my only option. The first crucible was ... not waterproof. I just put it in the forge and hammered the welds. It ain't more complex.
    I agree with Mister Ed:"just do it"
    Jack of all trades, master of none.
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  2. #12
    Who says MIG lacks penetration? IF it does, the guy hanging onto the torch suxs at welding. If ya got enough amps to mig 1/4" plate, the bevel isn't really necessary. If you are trying to weld 1/4" plate with a harbor freight 90amp mig machine, you'll need to bevel and do multi passes. Don't spend too much time on a steel crucible. The steel will break down and start to flake away to nothing after a few cycles in the furnace anyways.

    Yes that B&W video above is in IR mode at night.
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  3. #13
    my crucibles have held up very well, and as I only have a HF 90A welder, I did have to chamfer and do multiple passes as jagboy said. I learned welding from an actual welder that made boilers, so doing weld prep to everything to get 100% penetration just kinda seems second nature. Ive used my crucibles for around 2 years, and while some are getting a little thinner, Ive taken them up to copper melting temps many times and they work very well and have held up very well. I just keep my burner slightly rich so it doesnt oxidize the crucibles, so they will last much much longer.

  4. #14
    At this time, the thought is to use a ladle. (An antique one, which - I think - I still have. If not that one, then a fabricated item.)

    I've made ladles before - nearly thirty years ago.

    Dennis

    Ps: "in the furnace?" Uh, hadn't thought that far ahead. First weld the pot, then 'cook' it - oh, and use something closer to an old camp-stove, as in 'I hope it never gets hot enough to glow, even a little bit. After all, this is old wheel-wieght lead, with enough scrap solder and scrap-lead to cast decent.'

    Aluminum and zinc want real pots, as in one buys *those* at Legend in Nevada, or LaGrand industrial locally.
    Last edited by den; 02-11-2018 at 10:31 PM. Reason: Addendum
    Ouch! That stuff's hot!

  5. #15
    Senior Member Wolfcreek-Steve's Avatar
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    The few times I've melted lead, I just used my wife's cast iron frying pan. Works great, but she had to sew address labels in my underwear, so the nice officer can bring me back home when I get lost.
    What is that squeaking noise?

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by den View Post
    Ps: "in the furnace?" Uh, hadn't thought that far ahead. First weld the pot, then 'cook' it - oh, and use something closer to an old camp-stove,
    I use a camp stove or turkey fryer burner, that's all you need. I used to have an old plumbers furnace (left with buddy on a move) worked good. I have another now, just haven't gone through it yet.
    Just an old dog, learning new tricks.

  7. #17
    You know what sucks with wheel weights? Go get a 100lb bucket of weights from a tire shop. After you sort through them for 2 hrs, you MIGHT have 30lbs of actual lead. Since they starting getting banned about 5years ago, they are actually getting hard to find. I went through a good 300lbs of shit just to fill 3 legs on my anvil stand with actual lead. Most of my local tire shops won't give them away. One clown tried to charge me a buck a pound for STEEL and ZINC garbage. I told him to keep 'em. Lead melts easily, a furnace is not necessary, but makes it happen really fast.
    WWW.TheHomeFoundry.org
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  8. #18
    Steel weights can be, uh, scrapped - or put in the iron pile, to be converted to cast iron (see ironsides' video for how to make synthetic cast iron. Securing coke might be an issue - see smithing suppliers?)

    Zinc goes in the zinc pile - 1 part in ten aluminum - non-returnable cans, extrusions, etc - to nine of zinc. Might make an acceptable za-12(?)

    Lead for the lead-pile. Lead pick-ups (road-bed finds) have gotten 'blame skurse' in my area compared to a year or two ago, and one can more-or-less forget bothering tire/tyre stores for used weights locally.

    Unlike bullets/shot, hammers can be mostly recycled - melt off bunged-up hammer-head, flux with beeswax (or casting flux; I used to have some. Bought from Midway in early 90's) top-up, and re-pour. (Unlike orange or green compo-cast cost-like-the-devil dead-blow hammers... grumble)
    Ouch! That stuff's hot!

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by jagboy69 View Post
    You know what sucks with wheel weights? Go get a 100lb bucket of weights from a tire shop. After you sort through them for 2 hrs, you MIGHT have 30lbs of actual lead.
    I got more like 75% yield by weight. I didn't bother sorting except the obviously rubber pieces and fluff. Just fill the pot, melt off the usable lead, pour right through the trash, dump the pot, repeat. Wheel weights are about the lowest form lead scrap other than lead acid batteries but I get all I want for free....and that's the a good price.

    Best,
    Kelly
    My furnace build ----- I toil and fettle then foam turns to metal!

  10. #20
    Tried out new welding helmet last night, and the clarity is astonishing. Translation: h-f 'lids' may be cheap enough, but when you're as old as *Jody* (roughly; a year or so younger) and you're really nearsighted, you do not need added murkiness to make 'seeing the puddle' harder.

    Next: need to trim the bottom piece so's it's close to round, and then make it and the other piece properly 'groovy' for welding.

    Question: which stringer bead brushes do people like? As in 'they don't shed too much, nor 'lay down' too quick? (The h-f ones are *bad* for shedding, and bloodthirsty, too.) Bought a Milwaukee instance thereof, but wait until next week (or so) to learn how bad it 'sheds wire'.

    Also, tested the modified speed control with the 'screech'. 'Minimum speed' still puts out substantial air, so a vent-valve is warranted.

    Finally, have both flavors of welding rod at one location - the one where the Hobart is not. Supposedlt it can - with the existing wire - be turned up 'hot enough' to do 3/16ths with a single pass. Should I (sanity check)?
    Last edited by den; 02-16-2018 at 04:12 PM.
    Ouch! That stuff's hot!

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