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Thread: My first sad attempt at a real green sand pour...

  1. #1

    My first sad attempt at a real green sand pour...

    Hi there,

    So I to the shape right but the next is pitted rough and ... just wrong:

    This is the top:

    bronze base top.jpg

    This is the bottom

    bronze base bot.jpg

    I had on large vent hole on 1 side and one large pour hole on the other. Can someone tell me what I did wrong?

    Thanks,

    Arthur

  2. #2
    Senior Member Tobho Mott's Avatar
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    What type of bronze?

    Got a pic with the gating still on it?

    Tell us about your sand, is it very moist?

    More info will help us diagnose your casting and make suggestions to help you get a better result next time.

    I've definitely seen worse first attempts! I know it doesn't look like you wanted it to, but this is not really so bad...

    Jeff
    Tobho had learned to work Valyrian steel at the forges of Qohor as a boy. Only a man who knew the spells could take old weapons and forge them anew.

    How I built my oil furnace | My Photo Album | My Videos

  3. #3
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    Good on you for a first attempt. Especially for jumping straight to bronze. You can put that one on a fine polished wooden base and call it an artwork. Not easy to get such a fine form, texture and coloration.
    Mark

  4. #4
    Hi Jeff,

    I guess I jumped the gun. I already took the gates off. I bought Lionel's booklet on green sand casting and everything I've read says you should be able to clump it in your had to a cylinder without it breaking apart so that was what I did. One thing I forgot to do with put holes in the cope with a turkey skewer or something to make some more vent holes.

    Lionel also talks about packing the sand to tight and I wonder if that was a mistake too.

    My bronze is all scrap metal from around the house that I've had sitting for years.

    I'm also unsure of scooping the slag off the top. I'm never sure what is slag and what isn't.

    I've been going through the tutorials and posts on this website, but I'm sure of things like flux and what it's supposed to do for m.

    Thanks,

    Arthur

    - - - Updated - - -

    Hi Mark,

    Thanks. I'm not sure if you saw my robot head in my other post but this will be the base for it... they go together in terms of the texture... I will call it "Left to Die" or something like that...

    Arthur

  5. #5
    Administrator Site Admin
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    My bronze is all scrap metal from around the house that I've had sitting for years.
    Using scrap like that is a crap shoot. Sometimes it pours great; other times not so great.

    I've been going through the tutorials and posts on this website, but I'm sure of things like flux and what it's supposed to do for m.
    When I am making Everdur from copper wire, silicon, and manganese, I use a little borax in the middle of the melt just before I pour it into ingots. When I melt the ingots I don't use flux. The flux breaks down the oxidized copper, which is what most of the dross is. Everdur is the easiest bronze to pour. It makes little or no dross and does not seem to ansorb gas.

    I'm also unsure of scooping the slag off the top. I'm never sure what is slag and what isn't.
    Slag (or dross) is dirt and oxidized metal. Skim everything off until you have only a mirror surface on your melt.

    Richard
    When I die, Heaven can wait—I want to go to McMaster-Carr.

  6. #6

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