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Thread: front end alignment jig

  1. #11
    Senior Member evlwht-guy's Avatar
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    Based on the photos Rocco sent me I modified my device. I added a neodymium magnet [from a computer hard drive] to the far side and a tape measure slot to the near side.

    [url=https://flic.kr/p/22aiAmr]

    That is a nice Triumph Wolfcreeksteve. I once had one, a lot of fun. No the roads in NC are fine...I just have 3 cars, and an cheap.

  2. #12
    Senior Member Wolfcreek-Steve's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by evlwht-guy View Post
    Based on the photos Rocco sent me I modified my device. I added a neodymium magnet [from a computer hard drive] to the far side and a tape measure slot to the near side.

    [url=https://flic.kr/p/22aiAmr]

    That is a nice Triumph Wolfcreeksteve. I once had one, a lot of fun. No the roads in NC are fine...I just have 3 cars, and an cheap.
    I bought the Spitfire for my wife, for her 60th birthday. (how could I lose) We've enjoyed it for 3 summers. Because the engine was getting weak, it is all torn apart in the garage, getting a V6 and 5 spd out of a Ford Ranger plus a differential out of an Datsun 240-Z. Now the weak links are the half shafts. Lots of cutting and reworking on the frame to get the trans in where it needs to be.
    IMG_3210.jpg IMG_3231.jpg
    What is that squeaking noise?

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by evlwht-guy View Post
    Based on the photos Rocco sent me I modified my device. I added a neodymium magnet [from a computer hard drive] to the far side and a tape measure slot to the near side.
    The magnets are great addition especially if you're planning to work solo.

  4. #14
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    Also if you are interested in adjusting or measuring the camber, acceptable results can be had using a long straight board, with two small stubs of equal length sticking out of the edge to put on the edge of the rim. Then all you have to do is put a nail into the top of the board, tie on a plumb bob and then make markings on the bottom of the board and do some simple trig to find the angle. The longer you make the board, the greater the precision of the angle. Making the board too long though can make it unwieldy. Or you can attach a spirit level to a piece of angle with bolts threaded into it.

  5. #15
    Anyone got a design for setting camber on the ass end of an E-type? It's adjusted by adding and removing shims on the half shalfs. MEGA PITA.
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  6. #16
    Senior Member Wolfcreek-Steve's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jagboy69 View Post
    Anyone got a design for setting camber on the ass end of an E-type? It's adjusted by adding and removing shims on the half shafts. MEGA PITA.
    Could be worse Jag, Triumph didn't design in any adjustment for camber on the rear of the Spitfire. As the rear spring weakens and sags the camber becomes more and more negative and chews the hell out of the tires.
    What is that squeaking noise?

  7. #17
    I've seen the triumph saggy ass. I've thought about a Triumph... maybe a tr250 or an early tr6. The spitfire with a v6 and 5speed is going to be a blast on the road.
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  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by jagboy69 View Post
    Anyone got a design for setting camber on the ass end of an E-type? It's adjusted by adding and removing shims on the half shalfs. MEGA PITA.
    I've never done an alignment on a Jag but I have worked on other suspensions that use shims for adjustment so I'm pretty sure I know how I'd go about it. First I'd measure the vertical distance between the adjustable and non-adjustable pivot points of the suspension then, I'd measure the camber at the face of the rim using a digital level (I've got a 24" Smarttool level for that) and determine how far (distance not degrees) the rim needs to move to have the correct camber, take that number, multiply it by the vertical distance between the pivot points and divide that by the rim diameter and that should give a pretty good estimate of the shim you need to add (or remove). This method may not give you exactly the results you want but it should give a very good starting point. BTW, if you make a large change to the camber, be sure to double check the toe as well, the two are somewhat interrelated.

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