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Thread: I had a sample analysed

  1. #1

    I had a sample analysed

    So a friend of mine was over, and we were hanging out in the shop when he saw my wheel melter. So we started talking metal, and I found out he worked for an aluminum company(I'd prefer not to name it), and he offered on his own to test a sample of my metal. Having 100lbs of melted wheels and other parts ready to be casted, I gave him a piece. Fast forward a month or so until I saw him again, and he gave me this fancy printout.

    20170805_130021-e1502069660143-803x1024.jpg

    No big surprises, but I thought it was interesting enough to share. If you melt a lot of wheels, you probably have a similar composition.

    Last edited by RevRico; 08-07-2017 at 03:55 AM.

  2. #2
    What's it say? Cant enlarge it enough to read it.

    Best,
    Kelly
    My furnace build ----- I toil and fettle then foam turns to metal!

  3. #3
    http://revskitchen.com/wp-content/up...7-1024x813.jpg

    Mostly silicon and AL306.

    I know there is a way to post full size pictures here but I don't know how. The link I posted is direct to the source to make viewing easier.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
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    You may have accidently named the company (top line of the report page)

    I'm suprised the silicon is up in the 11% range, higher than I thought.

  5. #5
    Senior Member HT1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peedee View Post
    You may have accidently named the company (top line of the report page)

    I'm suprised the silicon is up in the 11% range, higher than I thought.
    looks like 4032 forging ... But I would cast it all day long

    V/r HT1

  6. #6
    Senior Member Robert's Avatar
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    What are the last three entries with Al XXX ? What does this mean?

    Robert
    "Whether you think that you can, or that you can't, you are usually right."
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  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Peedee View Post
    You may have accidently named the company (top line of the report page)

    I'm suprised the silicon is up in the 11% range, higher than I thought.
    Yea, that's why I'm not mentioning the other thing that got dropped off with the report. At least not now, but I will post about it eventually because it's really cool. Maybe after I edit the printout and replace the picture on my hosting service.

    Robert: I have no idea, that's part of why I posted it here.

    I was hoping someone might explain that or if there were anything glaring oddities on the report that I didn't notice.

    As far as I'm concerned there's casting aluminum and not casting aluminum, determined by if something was extruded or cast. I know there's a lot more to it than that, but I've got to much math going on with other projects to learn about the chemistry, currently.


    For the record, this was one small blob from when I melted 9 wheels, 4 old Mazda wheels and 5 newer jeep wheels. For all I know the next piece I the bucket could be entirely different, I just ran with the theory it all melted together so it's a good average. I'm still debating selling them as ant hill like casings on etsy because of how they stacked up when melting, but when I got an offer for an analysis I couldn't say no to the chance to look like I know what I'm doing.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Tobho Mott's Avatar
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    Got something really cool, but keeping it secret... Such a tease! Sounds like you got a good contact there.

    I don't know how to read that report either, I cast wheelium from cars but I've always just assumed it is alloy 356, cause that's what I read car wheels *usually* are, somewhere. Interesting...

    Slightly off topic, but how do you break down your wheels? I use a stack melter based on the one Bob Ward posted here a couple years ago. His is in a thread called 'water bath bulk scrapper for alumnium' IIRC. It turns the wheels into little blobs too, which can stack up and stick together where they land somewhat as you describe here, if one doesn't keep the bath bucket drip-catcher cold. Just curious and don't recall if you've posted about that before...

    Jeff
    Tobho had learned to work Valyrian steel at the forges of Qohor as a boy. Only a man who knew the spells could take old weapons and forge them anew.

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  9. #9
    I use his way. Seemed easiest, and I had everything on hand.

    Cut the top off a 50 gallon drum, cut some breather holes in the bottom, and a plastic container of water underneath that promptly melted when the blobs started stacking up.

    Except for my fire issue. The barrel has about 30lbs of metal in it that cooled because I couldn't keep the fire on top hot enough. When I run out of metal, I'm going to put the barrel up higher and start a fire under it to get the rest out.

    I have a plasma cutter now, and it does wonders on aluminum. I may use it in the future, but the burn barrel is much quieter and I like playing with fire.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Robert's Avatar
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    I have used a plas on aluminum wheels. It's not as fast and easy as you might think. Stick with the burn barrel.
    Robert
    "Whether you think that you can, or that you can't, you are usually right."
    - Henry Ford (1863-1947)

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