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Thread: More Fun With Lost Foam Part 2

  1. #21
    Moderator DavidF's Avatar
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    He shoots, He scores!! Kelly has done it again! Lol
    You really make it look easy. I think an exhaust manifold should be next on the list
    A calm sea does not make a skilled sailor...
    http://thehomefoundry.org

  2. #22
    Impressive foam work. nice job. you are the official king of foam.
    Visit me: WWW.HandcraftedLanterns.com
    "Sometimes by losing a battle you find a new way to win the war"
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  3. #23
    Senior Member OCD's Avatar
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    Nice Job Kelly.

    What's that going to be, a modified turbo blown weed eater?

    It's amazing what somebody can create as long we have a little knowledge, the proper tools and some common sense.

    For your insert guides, might I suggest using a hole saw if you ever replace them.

  4. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by OCD View Post
    ......For your insert guides, might I suggest using a hole saw if you ever replace them.
    Yes, fine for making blanks but rarely are they the desired size. They often need to be tuned to fairly high precision. In the case of the cylinder fixture I tweaked the OD until the bored holds in the foam and consistently gripped them. I just don't usually take the time to set a hole saw up in the drill press because a coarse belt on the sander removes stock so fast, the initial shape of the blank doesn't make much difference, but the fit of the center hole on the jig dowel does.

    One thing I forgot to mention in the jig video, the guides don't have to be round, they can be any shape or combinations of both. They can also be stepped on the bottom guide which allows changes to cutting diameter just by changing guide pin height. You can also use the retaining cap as a guide if you use a bearing guided router bit up there. If the guides aren't round it usually requires an index pin to initially locate them and keeping them from become in-clocked when machining. As long as you have enough cutter depth, you can cut fins on a square outside perimeter yet still have a cylindrical root around the cylinder wall or vice-versa.


    Best,
    Kelly

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    Quote Originally Posted by DavidF View Post
    ........I think an exhaust manifold should be next on the list
    Not ready for iron.....though water jacketed/cooled marine manifolds get away with ally right ;-)? That would be a great candidate one-piece part for the process.

    Best,
    Kelly

  5. #25
    Moderator DavidF's Avatar
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    though water jacketed/cooled marine manifolds get away with ally right ;-)?
    Back when I had my business I had a chrysler boat come in. It was either a 1971 or 1972 model and was all chrysler. Parts for that sucker were pretty unattainable. If I had known then what I know now I certainly would have used the lost foam process to cast up a new set of risers in bronze for it.
    A calm sea does not make a skilled sailor...
    http://thehomefoundry.org

  6. #26
    That is some very impressive work.

    I was needing to make a nice big finned cylinder head for an air compressor I made and was not sure how I was going to do it. I'm definitely barrowing your idea and making a nice finned aluminum head.
    I'm not sure what the compressor is from. I salvaged it from my grandfathers junk pile years ago. It's all cast iron twin piston and pumps up fast, but it get hot fast too because it has no fins.

    Keep up the great work.

  7. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by cojo98v6 View Post
    That is some very impressive work.

    I was needing to make a nice big finned cylinder head for an air compressor I made and was not sure how I was going to do it. I'm definitely barrowing your idea and making a nice finned aluminum head.
    I'm not sure what the compressor is from. I salvaged it from my grandfathers junk pile years ago. It's all cast iron twin piston and pumps up fast, but it get hot fast too because it has no fins.

    Keep up the great work.
    Thanks Cojo. I would recommend taking the time to coat the patterns in mud. Even with the gravity fed lost foam castings I've found the foam patterns poured bare in sand still had a fair bit of metal penetration into the sand which can make it difficult to totally remove from the casting. This results in some sand in the bottom of the crucible upon remelt which isn't a big deal to clean out of the spent heal but if you were machining the finished castings, I imagine it would be very hard on tooling. Besides looking much better, the mud coated castings come out clean as a whistle and for the most part it just falls off upon quenching in water and whatever may be left comes off with a few light strokes of a wire brush..

    Best,
    Kelly

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