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Thread: Babbitt bearing work

  1. #11
    Dave-
    I just happened to think ... maybe it was the finished product that you wanted to see. Here are a couple of pics of the 1903 Aermotor that I just finished up (the one with the insert bearings).
    Some parts are newly made (like the tail vane and tailbone) other parts were bored & bushed as needed to correct 113 years of wear.
    IMG_5586.jpg

    IMG_5588.jpg

  2. #12
    Hey Junkyard, great post. Can you post a few more details on the make/model and specs for the saw? Maybe a couple pictures of the whole saw? Looks like some nicely kept vintage machinery and I really like old iron, especially when it relates to pattern shop equipment.

    Best,
    Kelly

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by kcoffield View Post
    Hey Junkyard, great post. Can you post a few more details on the make/model and specs for the saw? Maybe a couple pictures of the whole saw? Looks like some nicely kept vintage machinery and I really like old iron, especially when it relates to pattern shop equipment.

    Best,
    Kelly
    Kelly,
    The bearing assembly is for a 36" H.B. Smith bandsaw that I have here in the shop. H.B. Smith was a prominent name in wood working in the mid to late 1800's and at one point, carried a large market share of the woodworking equipment manufactured in the US. Eventually, more recognizable names like Yates, American, Fay and Eagan, and Oliver moved in, and the H.B. Smith name faded into the past. I am by no means an expert on these matters, but the fellas over at OWWM.org tell me that this saw was made in 1893 +/- a few years. Apparently the curved spokes in the bandwheels, the bearing assembly, and a few other details are dead giveaways to the people that know. This saw was manufactured and assembled in the now long closed Smithville New Jersey facility. The saw has a 34" or 36" throat, I can't remember exactly. It takes a 19' 6" blade, and can resaw up to 14" if needed. The table tilts a bit past 45 degrees, and the table has dovetails machined into the table for the cast iron fence. The previous owner of this saw was a pattern shop in Lancaster Pennsylvania. I do not know where it was prior to that. Although the bearings were usable, I have been wanting to repour them for quite some time. There was also some minor repair work that needed to be done on the main shaft, so I opted just to disassemble the whole saw, give everything a good going over, and add a coat of paint. The tires were looking a little worn as well, so I ordered a new set and replaced the old ones. Aside from general woodworking needs, I use this saw mostly for resawing large wood blanks for split patterns prior to spinning them on the pattern lathe.

    IMG_0264.jpgIMG_0265.jpgIMG_0267.jpgIMG_0266.jpgIMG_0271.jpgIMG_0270.jpg

    Here is the lower wheel, it still needs some paint, and then it will be pressed onto the shaft.

    IMG_0268.jpg

    I still have a few odds and ends to finish, but the saw should be able to go back into regular service soon.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    ...Dave...

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Mister ED View Post
    Dave-
    I just happened to think ... maybe it was the finished product that you wanted to see. Here are a couple of pics
    Thanks for sharing, really interesting stuff. I really like the way the gearbox is indexed differently for each of the internal Babbitt pours.
    ...Dave...

  5. #15
    Moderator DavidF's Avatar
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    Now thats what i call a bandsaw!!!
    A calm sea does not make a skilled sailor...
    http://thehomefoundry.org

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by DavidF View Post
    Now thats what i call a bandsaw!!!
    A beautifully SEXY beast!!!

  7. #17
    Great machine. Even the table looks to be in remarkably good shape. I'm sure you will have it in a fine state of tune shortly when returned to service. Just trying to imagine what it might have felt like standing in front of that machine 120 years ago. Thanks for sharing.

    Best,
    Kelly

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