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Thread: Stage 2 of the Sickness

  1. #81
    Quote Originally Posted by OCD View Post
    Don't worry Kelly, I was on the welding table with not batteries or flammables around. I may be slightly crazy but not stupid.
    Mr. Murphy is alive, well, and ever-present.

    Best,
    Kelly

  2. #82
    hmm... I weld steel all the time. It's more friendly than aluminum. Now AC on steel? Haven't tried it. Look at

    Did you grind a clean section where you attach that grounding clamp? You say you had a puddle going on AC and then it blew up when you dabbed it with the filler rod? Not sure what rod you have, but it should be ER70s-2 or -6. The only time I ever got fireworks was learning to weld bronze bronze and the A-HOLE at airgas gave me bronze rod with ZINC in it even after I told him I was welding silicon bronze. I have learned not trust clowns at HD, Lowes, Autozone, Airgas. When you call jeff with your other question about the beep, toss this one by him.

    A post or two ago, you mentioned big wire and dinse connectors but you didnt mention what you were doing. Did you dork up how you hooked up the leads?
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  3. #83
    Senior Member OCD's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jagboy69 View Post
    hmm... I weld steel all the time. It's more friendly than aluminum. Now AC on steel? Haven't tried it. Look at

    Did you grind a clean section where you attach that grounding clamp? You say you had a puddle going on AC and then it blew up when you dabbed it with the filler rod? Not sure what rod you have, but it should be ER70s-2 or -6. The only time I ever got fireworks was learning to weld bronze bronze and the A-HOLE at airgas gave me bronze rod with ZINC in it even after I told him I was welding silicon bronze. I have learned not trust clowns at HD, Lowes, Autozone, Airgas. When you call jeff with your other question about the beep, toss this one by him.

    A post or two ago, you mentioned big wire and dinse connectors but you didnt mention what you were doing. Did you dork up how you hooked up the leads?
    No I didn't grind an area of the table leg, which is where I attached the working cable (ground).

    Inweld 3/32" 70S-2 rods.
    Project steel was ground & cleaned along with a cleaned rod.
    Amps set @ 85, balance @ 100, freq @ 65, 15cf of gas.
    Which does mean a hill of beans as the welder should have been on DC.

    If it does it again on DC then the metal or filler rods have something in them they're not suppose to.

    After I had the puddle going and approx. 2-3 second after filler was added it started ever so slightly sparking/splattering like an old sparkler, and then POP.
    Then she blew.

    The second it blew I was scrambling to get all of my cables up off the floor and keep from getting holes burned into them.
    Going to find me some leather sleeves for pedal and ground cables just in case - when it happens again.

    From what I had read, all steels "should" be welded on DC.

    That bleeping beeping sound disappeared.
    Have no idea what it was. <shrug>

    I have realized that if you have even the slightest bend or kink in the water lines the alarm goes off, which is a good thing.

    Next step brother, Next step.
    Learn how to not Stick the Stick. lol

    This is DEFINITLY not going to take place inside the garage.

    Outside, under a canopy, with a fan blowing up my arse.

    Have way to much steel welding to do to be messing with the TIG.

  4. #84
    Then it has to be that you were on AC. As you already know AC is only used on Aluminum and Magnesium. I haven't screwed that one up... yet.

    I kinda figured you were going to do the stick weld thing. Stick is definitely something I wouldn't do in the garage. I wont even mig in my garage. If I had a bunch of stick work to do, I'd be picking up a cheap tombstone for that one. Of course the invertig is easily capable of stick welding a trailer together, but to me that's like running a using a really nice classic car up and down a dirt road to get grocerys. My luck, I'd knock it off it's stand or get it crushed under an axle. I'm cool with trashing fairly cheap equipment in the name of getting the job done, your machine is anything but cheap.

    Here's a new tombstone I consider DISPOSABLE! lol Drag this cheap bitch outside and let it get rained on. Back over it, you won't cry I promise!
    http://www.homedepot.com/p/Lincoln-E...1170/100041326
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  5. #85
    Senior Member OCD's Avatar
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    Gotta remember Jag, your unit has ....... short leads......

    My unit has the extra loooooong leads.......
    TIG isn't going anywhere, staying put on the work bench and I'll drag my loooooong leads outside to burn something... I mean fused some metal together.

    On a side note,
    I don't have anymore room in the garage to be storing any more of anything, especially a that hunka you linked above.

    Hell, I've been getting rid of stuff just to make more room.

  6. #86
    Senior Member OCD's Avatar
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    I'm somewhat embarrassed to even show you all the following pic...... but it's all part of the learning process.

    Did some studying and the fireworks were my own ignorant fault not paying attention and attempting to weld steel on all the wrong settings.
    I can only hope somebody else can learn from my mistake(s).



    Drug the table, torch & ground out into the driveway, set the machine on the "Proper" settings and let her rip.
    The victim plate steel is 3/8" unheated.
    I started out with a 3/32" tungsten, rod & #7 cup, machine set at 90 amps, which I knew was too low but wanted to see what was happening with my torch.
    After 2 small passes I cranked it up to 180amps.
    Quickly found out the lift start technique didn't-doesn't work so well for me so I ended up mashing the peddle and pecking the tungsten into my work piece which worked quite well.
    At the end of the runs I gradually let off the pedal.
    I think I'm getting there slowly but surely.

    Here's the results.


  7. #87
    Senior Member r4z0r7o3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OCD View Post
    I started out with a 3/32" tungsten, rod & #7 cup, machine set at 90 amps, which I knew was too low but wanted to see what was happening with my torch.
    Good for you, nothing wrong with experimenting like that. You knew going in it was too little heat, but can you tell from how the welds appear, that they're insufficiently "melted in"? Generally, the "hard" line between bead and base is a good indicator. It should be a (mostly) smooth transition.

    You can duplicate that exact same situation w/o touching the amps, but instead moving too fast and/or using too thick of a filler rod.

    Good to be able to notice those things by sight.

    Steel feels like cheatin' now don't it

    Quickly found out the lift start technique didn't-doesn't work
    It's a good skill to have, I've been in a position several times where it would have been impossible to use a pedal. Learning it will also help with your not-sticking-the-stick endeavors

    I think I'm getting there slowly but surely.
    Oh, no doubt at all from this end, we can all see the positive progression. Keep at 'er, the learning curve looks much less steep from the top-side (not that I'm any real expert)
    "Things that are complex are not useful, things that are useful are simple."
    - Mikhail Kalashnikov

  8. #88
    Senior Member OCD's Avatar
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    Thanks r4z0r7o3,

    I also noticed I was having to push the rod deep into the puddle, unlike Tigging w/ aluminum.

    Any time somebody can add to their worldly knowledge & experience base it's well worth the time & effort.

    And yes, it was like cheating.
    Too damn easy, IMO.

    I kinda felt a little stupid to be totally honest, not much of a challenge.

  9. #89
    Steel is fun. 3/8" is thick, 150amps DC with 3/32" tungsten at a minimum. Get some 1/8" steel to start with. Set 125amps, work the pedal. After the piece warms up, you'll settle in nicely around 100 would be my guess. Keep up the good work. Each time it gets a little easier and you get a little better.
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  10. #90
    Senior Member OCD's Avatar
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    Oh, I've got a crap load of 1/8", 3/16", 1/4" & 1/2" stock to be welded up.
    Went shopping today.

    Lots of stuff to build for the foundry work.
    Tools & bases for the furnace and kiln to start.

    I'm going to go pick up a metal chop saw tomorrow.

    Then the real fun begins.

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