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Thread: Stage 2 of the Sickness

  1. #1
    Senior Member OCD's Avatar
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    Stage 2 of the Sickness

    Since I've began my hobby of furnace building & casting I found myself in the need of new toys to accommodate the process, not to mention I needed a career change.

    First set of toys arrived today.



    In reference to the cooler.
    You folks running one, is algae inhibitor required?
    And if so, would the water stabilizer solution that's used for onboard marine fresh water systems okay to use?
    I have bottles and bottles of that stuff.

    250 CF cylinder in route from Lake Welding Supplies off ebay out of Belle Glades, Fl.

    Assgas wanted $350 for a 200CF cylinder + taxes & $46 refills. Hahahahahahahahaha, NOT happening.

    Optrel Panoramaxx helmet in route as well.

    Went to HF and looked at their Vulcan welding cabinet listed for $299.
    It appears to be an ok built cabinet but IMHO, not worth $321 (tax included).

    Going to build a custom welding cart/cabinet station.

    And I don't even know how to weld.


    Nothing like jumping in head first.

    Also went ahead and picked up a Salamander A12 for the keg furnace.
    Largest that will fit in there.

  2. #2
    Boys it doesnt get much prettier than that sitting on a work bench. Congrats on a fine setup. If that thing was a miller, you'd have 5-6k in it and still not get that the duty cycle of a Stel.
    Now the work really begins. Use the HF start and just practice slowly moving across some metal and maintaining the tungsten tip as close as you can without touching the metal. Do that for at least an hour driving a molten puddle around before pickup up the filler rod. Next step will be to light up, get a puddle, add a drop of filler, then off the pedal slowly. *Think a spot weld) Next will be learning to dab into the puddle, move a little bit, dab again. Run beads before you start sticking crap together. You can do this! I actually started on aluminum, but get some 1/8" steel, set it at 125amps and start playing around.

    HA.. I just noticed your avatar. You do know we are going to make all the lincoln and miller weenies jealous right? lol
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  3. #3
    Senior Member OCD's Avatar
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    Bwhahahahahaha

    BWHAhahahahahahaha

  4. #4
    Senior Member chubbyjp77's Avatar
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    Alge shouldn't be a problem if you run Low Conductivity Tig Coolant. Most manufacturers include something to help keep alge and other organisms at bay. Adding pretty much any chemical will increase conductivity and you don't really want to do that when using high frequency. I'd spend the money on the right coolant especially since it's a new machine. Pay attention to make sure you get coolant for Tig because they make coolant for Mig guns that is different. Benefits will be low conductivity, lower pump wear, less deposits, and peace of mind. A filter is a good idea on your cooler too if there isn't one already.

    Nice machine BTW. Practice and patience will get you there. I'm a Lincoln and Miller owner and I'm not jealous, but I am happy for you. Start sharpening tungsten and expelling Argon into the atmosphere and you'll be burning projects together in no time flat. The welding cart is a great first project after some initial practice.

    Also Tig gloves are a great investment. Mig/stick gloves make it difficult if not impossible to manipulate the torch and filler especially when starting out.

  5. #5
    Senior Member OCD's Avatar
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    I ran by one of our local welding suppliers after work today and picked up 2 gallons of Weldcote Metals Blue Coolant (which isn't blue )
    specially formulated for water cooled Plasma, MIG, TIG, resistance welding systems & general industrial applications.

    Since the WC reservoir is an opaque white plastic I added a few drops of green food coloring for coolant level verification purposes.
    Filled it all the way to the Max level line.
    Will have to top off once all connected and fired up.
    Torch lines are 25' so I know the reservoir will be needing some more coolant.
    Might just let it be as long as it's in the safety level zone.

    Helmet is scheduled to here this Friday.
    Cylinder is suppose to be here by this Saturday.

    I'm going to be running a dedicated sub panel for the Welder and Kiln so that little project is on the To Do list for this weekend.

    Yeah, I want to get that puppy fired up & burn something real bad. lol

  6. #6
    Senior Member OCD's Avatar
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    I was checking this video out last night.
    Very informative.


  7. #7
    This guy sharpening tungstens INTO the plane of rotation gave me the CREEPS. I seriously do not recommend doing that. I like stuff that flys to generally be leaving my presence. I see we have another guy that welds in a T-shirt. :-/ Change the channel bro, this guy is an asshat. Look up https://www.youtube.com/user/ChuckE2009 or
    https://www.youtube.com/user/weldingtipsandtricks I always get worried when I see green and yellow boxes. Even Jody is guilty of that BS. Chucky once upon a time was also a SELLOUT, but he recently saw the light and catches a huge amount of crap for it. lol Chucks old videos are excellent when he just came out of welding school doing the tig thing.

    I use the side of my bench grinding wheel towards the bottom half. If the tungsten slips, it will stick in the wall instead of my balls! (grinder mounted low for sitting) You didnt tell me how that table worked out. Just be sure what ever table you set up, you can SIT in a chair and your foot can comfortable sit on the ground flat. Tig tables are usually short for this reason. I like my table with my eyes level only about 10inches above the table while sitting in a chair. Doing tig work, you have to get your face right up in there where the action is. I've had to Tig standing up on that last set of lanterns and it's a pain in the butt. You gotta have your amps set right and balance on one leg while you mash the pedal full tilt. It works, but it's not pretty. I found with stuff thats 3feet tall, I set it on the ground between my legs and ground right to the piece. Again, so I can get my shield right up in there to see whats going on. The other option that works is a finger switch on your torch, but again, it's full on, or full off.
    Visit me: WWW.HandcraftedLanterns.com
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  8. #8
    Senior Member OCD's Avatar
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    What I was referring to as informative was about the different tip angles and profiling (direction of grind footprints) and their abilities or lack of penetration & characteristics in nature.

    If one has an open mind and a little common sense, even the bad informative practices (bad habit(s) like grinding into the direction of the disk) is worth more than the rest of the positive information presented.

    All depends on how and at what angle somebody looks and perceives something.

    As for the table, until I get the weld station built I'll be using my regular work bench.
    Just going to throw a steel plate on top for now.
    The legs are adjustable so that doesn't create an issue.

  9. #9
    Unless you have a tungsten grinder, you'll probably grind tungstens slightly different every time. When I sit down with half a dozen ground down ready for a little welding session, I sometimes laugh as I see the differences in them. Do I get back up and walk over to the grinder? Nope. I'm going to dip its ass just like the one before and after it. lmao. Ya just learn how to work the torch. I bet I could just break off tips on the corner of the table and keep going. On the old transformer machines when doing aluminum, ya ball that sucker up anyways. With the IGBT stuff, points last longer. Youtube is littered with tungsten fodder, it generates views which generate money.

    You always know what kind of tig clown you're dealing with when the wife beater and tat sleeves are visible when they are running welds. Same reason I've witnessed people operate aircraft differently if wearing a uniform and neck tie as opposed to shorts and a t-shirt.
    Visit me: WWW.HandcraftedLanterns.com
    "Sometimes by losing a battle you find a new way to win the war"
    -- Donald Trump --

  10. #10
    Senior Member chubbyjp77's Avatar
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    The angle has a little to do with how well a tungsten works but isn't nearly as important as the direction of which it's ground. When ground radially the arc wanders and is inconsistent due to the ridges left around the tips circumference. If you grind them axially the arc will not wander nearly as much. I like to leave a slightly blunt point on mine to increase tip life and have a little broader arc. Unfortunately a blunt tip doesn't help keep it out of my puddle so the life part becomes negligible LOL. Tungsten choice has a lot to do with its welding characteristics as well but I'm not going to try to spell all the weird alloys so you'll hafta read up on that on your own.

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