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Thread: Advice on food safe metal?

  1. #11
    All-
    Thanks very much for the feedback, nice to know that there should not be anything wildly poisonous lurking in the metal (did I mention that I'm not a metallurgist and that I didn't even know there are two L's in metallurgy?).

    notes-
    a) there will be no steam pressure in this machine, just hot water. steam is for milk, milk is for ladies
    b) I will be machining and welding but I don't know anything about melting metal so I cannot cast anything (except aspersions about milk in coffee)
    c) I'll be using silicone o-rings and gaskets.
    d) choice of hardware will depend on the design of the connections.

    Thanks again all.

  2. #12
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    Aluminum pots were hurt by a panic over a supposed link between Alzheimers and Aluminum, completely bogus of course, but harm done to the industry

    Automotive alloys are mostly Aluminum alloyed with Silicon and/or Copper and Magnesium

    They contain other non alloying elements (tramps) from smelting or recycling at very low levels

    These elements are chemically combined and would need to get leached out by dissolving in to water, a very slow process, I suspect at the limits of detection, I see no concern

    This is not a comment about you psammy, you asked a great question for learning, but I often have given up debating people about good natural chemicals vs those bad industrial chemicals, and just let folks get on with their magnets, crystals, chakras and foot bath cleanses, I fear we are heading to a new dark ages.....those magic sword steel people really irk me....

    Same as the fear that a casting becomes radioactive after x-ray, some people can't be reasoned with

  3. #13
    some people can't be reasoned with
    Sadly, no they can't. I came here for sound, common sense advice and I'm satisfied with the answer. Before I give myself any awards for intelligence, I should probably figure out why I would go through all of this rather than just getting a real one on Ebay.

    http://ebay.to/2sncjcN


  4. #14
    Another thing to think about is drip style coffee makers, they usually have a small pump that pumps the water out of the reservoir and through an aluminum heating element that sits underneath of the plate that the coffee pot sits on. Usually the heating element is just a ceramic heater element that is part of the aluminum tube, which is usually in a U shape. They do it that way so that the heater element does dual purpose and heats both the pot of coffee and the coffee itself. Here's the most common version that I find when tearing them apart.


    So aluminum stuff in contact with the water is a common everyday occurrence tbh.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by FoundryJoe View Post
    This is not a comment about you psammy, you asked a great question for learning, but I often have given up debating people about good natural chemicals vs those bad industrial chemicals, and just let folks get on with their magnets, crystals, chakras and foot bath cleanses, I fear we are heading to a new dark ages.....those magic sword steel people really irk me....
    But have you heard of that UTTERLY EVIL substance Dihydrogen Monoxide!!!! It's everywhere, and as little as a teaspoon can KILL!!!!111oneoneoneoneeleventyone ;oD

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by psammy View Post
    I should probably figure out why I would go through all of this rather than just getting a real one on Ebay.
    Because building stuff is more fun That said though, those little LaPav units aren't half bad, just need to keep an eye on the boiler temp (mostly they don't even have themostatic control).

  6. #16
    Most factory drink dispensers rely heavily on 303 or 304 stainless for the pieces in contact with food. Copper and its alloys can be tinned (like old cooking pots) or plated. Aluminum is usually anodized but not always - I'm not sure of the rules for when it is applied.

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by HWooldridge View Post
    Most factory drink dispensers rely heavily on 303 or 304 stainless for the pieces in contact with food. Copper and its alloys can be tinned (like old cooking pots) or plated. Aluminum is usually anodized but not always - I'm not sure of the rules for when it is applied.
    yea, with soda drinks, the acidity of the drinks tends to be quite corrosive to stuff like aluminum and other alloys, but stainless is about as resistant as you can get on a cheap scale. With a coffee maker where the only thing going through it is just water, the acidity level isnt very high at all. Also, the anoidizing is just an oxide layer over the aluminum, which leave a fresh cut aluminum piece out in fresh air over a few seconds and it'll form an oxide layer over top of it, and will grow in thickness as time goes on. All that anodizing does is just controls how the oxide layer forms so that it has little pinholes in it that dye can go into to color it.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by FoundryJoe View Post
    I fear we are heading to a new dark ages...
    Actually I believe its the dark "New age" people we need to fear.......

    Cheers Phil
    So, whats your Plan B?

  9. #19
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    cae2100-- your pictured coffee maker is actually slightly more elegant than you make out. In addition to heating the water and warming the pot, that hot U-tube is the pump. A check valve on the reservoir side closes when a steam bubble forms in the loop; not being able to flow back, the bubble raises a column of water and dumps it in the dripper. With the pressure relieved, the check valve re-opens to let new water repeat the process. It's a bubble pump.
    "The former lives of objects need not interfere with their current use."

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