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Thread: Hi AlloyAvenue, I'm an Industrial Videographer, foundryman & 3rd Gen Pattern Maker

  1. #1

    Hi AlloyAvenue, I'm an Industrial Videographer, foundryman & 3rd Gen Pattern Maker

    Figured I'd introduce myself as I've lurked here for a long time but never posted due to not having anything to add till now. I've written a 20,000 word article over the very basics of foundry work and what I think would be important for anyone new to it to know. It's still under construction but I've put over 200 hours into it already in the last 3 weeks and I just want to get it out there for now. It's complete with common foundry terms and equipement, Ever casting method possible and I detail out the qualities of refractory sand vs molding sand and the science behind sand and what makes them useful for what scenarios. I also go into the history of every casting method complete with historical stories and the progression of patents and technologies that brought us to the foundry works we know today. It might be a be elementary for this forum but you might find the history parts entertaining and some of the sand science useful. Again it's still incomplete and if you find anything I've gotten wrong let me know and I'll revise it. It's designed more so as a glimpse into ever industrial method with DIY in mind, rather than a DIY tutorial for newbies. Currently all my experience is in industrial settings so I don't feel comfortable advising DIY much. you guys probably know way more than I do when it comes to that.

    http://garenphillips.com/casting-pattern-basics/

    Now I should probably explain who i am. I'm Garen, if the url didn't give it away lol, I've worked at my families aluminum foundry and CNC shop, Phillips Patterns & Castings, since i was 15, currently 27. This year I've quit my family's foundry to pursue my own path of financial independence via e-commerce, freelancing and entrepreneurship which is a fancy way to say I'm working out of my house and unemployed. I'm a trained pattern maker from my father and uncle who have a combined experience of 100 years and they were trained by my grandfather who has been one since the 1930's. They are all trained in traditional mahogany pattern making without the use of CNC machines but my uncle was a life time pattern maker up until 65 with the use of CNC's and CAD/CAM. Today I mostly used FDM 3D printers to create patterns for use to make cast matchplates or mounted directly to BB plywood. But I can also program CNC machines for pattern work as well as high speed 4th axis machining of aluminum and steel fixture making. In 1947 my grandfather founded Phillips Patterns at the age of 19 in his chicken coop and it has grown into what you see today in my videos. As for videos, part of my new career change is being an industrial videographer. Along with making my own videos, website, articles and products to try and make money I'll also be traveling around to various companies and showcasing the industrial side of how things are made. I'm a huge fan of the old shows like "How Things are Made" or "how Things Work" but being in the industry I always felt they missed out a lot as the hosts don't actually know how any of the stuff works. I've grown up around green sand, air set, permanent mold, die casting and CNC machining as well as studied metallurgy and refractory science on the side so I'm hoping that experience and knowledge will help me out in not only showcasing company's but also going into detail on the science, history and methodology of whatever it is I'm videoing and not just be eye candy. But eye candy is always nice. Long term I'm looking to advise and help customers and businesses connect as well as bring some more industrial grade materials and methods to the DIY community if possible. I was laid off for 6 months back in the 2008 recession and my family's company almost went under because of it. Part of making these videos is not just to be an entertaining but to also help rebuild and educate people on all the stuff lost in the the destruction of manufacturing we saw these past 10 years.

    Here is one of my first videos showcasing a Tool & Die shop. This company has been making our die cast molds for almost 20 years now and started out by making the molds for Tippmann paintball guns. So if you've ever played paintball at a field, you've probably personally handled a casting from my company. If you played around 2008-2011 there's a 90% chance I handled the gun you used as well. We are currently installing a 600 ton die cast machine in the building and a very awesome mold is being put on it but i can't talk about it yet and I'm not sure if I'm going to even be able to show it.



    This video is a short 5 minute one that showcases the production level green sand foundry of my family's shop. I worked here for about 2 years total doing everything from molding, pouring, knockout, air set molding and pattern making.



    Upcoming videos are going to be on refractory science as well as probably showcasing my family's gating methods and maybe some history of foundry. First I need to finish my website though. If you have any questions feel free to ask on here or just shoot me a pm on here or any of my social.
    Last edited by dzuari; 04-14-2017 at 01:56 AM.

  2. #2
    Moderator DavidF's Avatar
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    Welcome back Garen. I have enjoyed your videos over the years and look forward to seeing more of them. Also looking forward to reading your write up on casting when i get home.
    Yep, know those tippman paintball guns well.
    A calm sea does not make a skilled sailor....

  3. #3
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    Hello Garen, glad to meet you.
    I thoroughly enjoyed the 80 lb vid. It was a complete alpha /omega showing of the process. I've already shared it on another forum that has nothing to do with casting because it was so comprehensive. The trolley system is what blew my mind, they knew how to set up a system.
    I also watched the 1000 lb vid...stay on tract, watching the molding and you panned away to another worker. Over all, nice work, hope it puts food on the table.
    Bones

  4. #4
    Are there imbedded videos? If so, I cannot see them. I see a blank space.

    Best,
    Kelly

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  6. #6
    Moderator DavidF's Avatar
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    Ok, just checked out your write up. Thats is the most information on sand I have found to date, Now if only my foundry supplier could give as much detail. Im going to have to go back through it in more detail. There is alot there to take in...
    A calm sea does not make a skilled sailor....

  7. #7
    Senior Member cjcaster's Avatar
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    Great information, thanks much.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by dzuari View Post
    I just used the insert video button, here's the direct links

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RSXT6No8eFM&t=72s

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NMBtpbhaQI0
    I could see the imbedded videos this morning but not last night.

    Garen, I enjoyed the videos. I have a number of friends that are Foundrymen and Pattern makers, and also that run various types of manufacturing businesses, as do I. Since I was a kid, I've always had a fascination with how things were made. Not to knock them, nor would we want to be, but we can't all be Doctors and Lawyers and service providers. People that know how to pull raw ore out of the ground and make dirt into iPhones are awesome folks, but there really is a lack of appreciation in our society for what it actually takes to do things like that. It should be something that is revered not cast into lower social status and if your videos can help remedy that, bravo.

    One thing I've learned is 90+ percent of people that ask you how something is done or made don't really want to know. That's because they don't really have the ability to understand the details that are the real answer to the question and their eyes glaze over after a couple of minutes of discussion. IMO, the key to success in your videography projects will be to select your target audience thoughtfully and also crafting the degree of technical content between the expert and the laymen.

    If someone is only asking you what time it is, you cant tell them how your watch is made. Your videos seem to strike a nice balance. Thanks for that.

    Best,
    Kelly

  9. #9
    Senior Member Robert's Avatar
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    Fantastic work! Very comprehensive. This will be useful to a lot of people if they take the time.
    Robert
    "Whether you think that you can, or that you can't, you are usually right."
    - Henry Ford (1863-1947)

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  10. #10
    Thanks everyone

    Quote Originally Posted by kcoffield View Post
    That's because they don't really have the ability to understand the details that are the real answer to the question and their eyes glaze over after a couple of minutes of discussion. IMO, the key to success in your videography projects will be to select your target audience thoughtfully and also crafting the degree of technical content between the expert and the laymen.
    That's what's great about youtube and the internet in general, it's a new medium to share knowledge. you don't have to read 3 books to understand something if there's a video that is edited well and concise. Probably 70% of my knowledge is google and youtube, the rest is experience and just asking guys that've been around a lot longer than me. I graduated 182/184 in my high school if that gives you an idea of my academic prowess lol.

    Edit

    Quote Originally Posted by DavidF View Post
    Thats is the most information on sand I have found to date
    That was the plan.

    Quote Originally Posted by kcoffield View Post
    I have a number of friends that are Foundrymen and Pattern makers, and also that run various types of manufacturing businesses, as do I.
    If you guys are in the midwest area I can come shoot your guys businesses. I have a vacation in july up near Toledo and I'm trying to get into a brass cannon foundry and a flask making company if possible.

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