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Thread: Planning stages of new furnace build

  1. #11
    Senior Member Zapins's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Petee716 View Post
    Does bronze stick to the refractory?
    Oh yes. Quite well.

  2. #12
    Senior Member machinemaker's Avatar
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    Just to be a voice of dissent: I have never had a furnace with a drain and never needed a drain. I have always used silicon carbide crucibles or in a pinch clay graphite crucibles. I have poured thousands of pounds of silicon bronze and several million pounds of aluminum. The only problem I have ever had with metal in the bottom of my furnaces was from over filling the crucibles or sloppy melting practices. All of that I can blame myself for! Almost all the commercial furnaces I have used over the past 40 years did not have drain, even high speed induction furnaces. I really have to wonder about what I read here on this forum or I have had a sheltered casting life. I
    do not mean to be an ass hole but I guess I do not see the point of having drains.
    kent
    Kent
    There is beauty, power and excitement in simple old technology!

  3. #13
    The difference Kent is you know what you're doing. I on the other hand am guaranteed to need that hole when I do something dumb. :-)
    Visit me: WWW.HandcraftedLanterns.com
    "Sometimes by losing a battle you find a new way to win the war"
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  4. #14
    I haven't forgotten about all this, the weather has been crap and the cars needed attention. Now it's time for an update.

    I've sourced ceramic wool for free thanks to a friend. This friend is also making a bulk buy on kastolite in the coming weeks. Once he gets everything picked up, I'll be able to get started putting together my propane build.

    So far, all I've accomplished its getting the valve out and filling it with water. But babY steps.

    Should be starting on the actual build in another 2 weeks, at which time ilk be bit more regularly posting here again.

  5. #15
    Keep at it Rev. It's taken some of us years to get this thing to completion. I will say it's totally worth it!
    Visit me: WWW.HandcraftedLanterns.com
    "Sometimes by losing a battle you find a new way to win the war"
    -- Donald Trump --

  6. #16
    I got the call today, my friend is picking up the Kastolite tomorrow afternoon. I'm either getting it this weekend or next weekend. I'm hoping this includes ceramic wool, but a 55 pound bag of Kastolite should be enough to do a solid floor and 1-2" wall.

    20170518_173301-1024x576.jpg

    This happened today. Used my angle grinder for a starter hole, the sawzall the rest of the way, then round the outside edges of both pieces a little bit. Now I'm officially stuck.

    I don't know how to drill a hole for the burner at an angle. Just overdrill the hole a little bit to get the angle right? Or is there some mythical hole saw that could do it?

    For the drain hole, I'm going to use a 1.25" hole saw, and for the vent, I need to borrow an arbor, but I should be able to stack 2 holesaws together to make an even hole.

    I'm really excited for this too come together.

    In other news, my stack burner only kind of worked. About half the aluminum melted out, the rest is still in the barrel. I just haven't had time to keep a fire fed to burn it out, but I'm thinking about using something a little hotter than wood to get it out. It might just way until I use up what melted out.

  7. #17
    Don't know what the "best" way is, but I used bimetal hole saws to cut the holes in my propane tank. Located and drilled for the pilot bit in the hole saw arbor and then went to town with it. Just held it at the approximate needed angle and went slow. A little coolant in a squirt bottle helps the hole saw stay alive too. Tweaked the hole to final position with a sanding drum on a cordless drill. Used a piece of pipe through the hole and measured to the tank wall to determine when it was done.

    Did fabricate a fitting with a similar pilot hole to screw into the 3/4" pipe hole in the lid and used that to ensure things were centered up for cutting the vent.

    Best of luck with it.

    Al

  8. #18
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    I used a step drill on the drain hole, made quick work of it, topped out at 7/8".
    Angle grinder for the vent and tuyere, just go round and round until it punches through, no deep cuts. My favorite tool.
    Bones

  9. #19
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    This page has a pretty neat tool for layout.
    http://www.harderwoods.com/pipetempl...&Submit=Submit
    Read the linked tutorial. It's a short and informative read. I used the template provided in Colin Pecks book but it would be inappropriate to post it here I think.
    Once you have the template drawn on the tank, cut the hole with whatever you have at hand. I used hole saws and angle grinder. You can use a jig saw too. My tank is stainless so the jig saw blades weren't up to the task.

    Pete

  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by FishbonzWVa View Post
    I used a step drill on the drain hole, made quick work of it, topped out at 7/8".
    Angle grinder for the vent and tuyere, just go round and round until it punches through, no deep cuts. My favorite tool.
    We dont need no stinking drain hole... I can live without just about any tool in my shop.... EXCEPT THE ANGLE GRINDER! I've learned to even hang on to small cutoff wheels just for this very purpose. Helpful making round cuts in metal.
    Visit me: WWW.HandcraftedLanterns.com
    "Sometimes by losing a battle you find a new way to win the war"
    -- Donald Trump --

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