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Thread: A thread for random quick questions

  1. #31
    The trick with any coating be it nail varnish or clear coat is always going to be giving the surface a 'key' for the liquid to bite into. Not possible with highly polished anything. Mop and glow used to do a fantastic job putting a shine on my boots in the military, but if ya flexed the toe, cracked off bad. In the end, good old parade gloss was worth the effort. Maintaining anything highly polished is just part of the job keeping it looking like that. On airplane deice boots, we use a product that I SWEAR is mop and glo. Except it's 100 time more expensive. It actually does stand up to inflation cycles and the coating hangs on pretty good for a month or so. Then I get the joy of removing it with MEK. Don't ya just hate high maintenance stuff like airplanes, cars and women?? Well, maybe not women... lol

    Why not a good quality automotive clear coat? One you actually have to mix and doesn't come in a can. They don't yellow and last 7years if it's not a chrysler.
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  2. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by Ralph View Post
    Quick Question: How can I stop a cast al. object oxidising over time when out in the weather? They lose their initial shine with time. Any easy fix?
    Ralph, look into setting up a couple tubs that you can annodize in. Honestly, I annodize parts at home and it's remarkably cheap and simple. Different processes provide different benefits to aluminum. Some provide better corrosion resistance, some improve the hardness etc. As long as you don't mind certain processes affecting the color, it's great. And there's almost always a work around if you do mind.

    Edit: Hardness... That isn't the exact word I'm looking for. It's hard to explain... The oxidation layer produced by the process IS harder. But take for example pure aluminum; it has a melting point of 658C. Aluminum oxide has a melting point of 2050C. But the oxide has lower linear expansion values. Meh, its 0400 in the morning here. Most importantly, it can weather-proof your aluminum.

  3. #33
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    I put a clear powder coat on a house number plaque with polished numbers.
    Bones

  4. #34
    Senior Member Ralph's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wes Henderson View Post
    Ralph, look into setting up a couple tubs that you can annodize in...
    I just had a look at a few Youtube clips on anodising. I never realised how do-able this was, believing that it was somehow beyond the average home-handy person. (Not the PC term there.) It may not be the original bright al. shine, but I really do have to give this a go. The finished items can look stunning. Many thanks, Wes.

    I bought some long life, high gloss floor polish today, and put it on. Unfortunately, I can't give a quick summary of how long lasting it is. Ask in six, or twelve months. I do know that some molded items left in the weather out the back go white-ish within a few months. Not the ideal!

  5. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by Ralph View Post
    I just had a look at a few Youtube clips on anodising. I never realised how do-able this was, believing that it was somehow beyond the average home-handy person. (Not the PC term there.) It may not be the original bright al. shine, but I really do have to give this a go. The finished items can look stunning. Many thanks, Wes.

    I bought some long life, high gloss floor polish today, and put it on. Unfortunately, I can't give a quick summary of how long lasting it is. Ask in six, or twelve months. I do know that some molded items left in the weather out the back go white-ish within a few months. Not the ideal!
    YEA! You will have to update us with how well it works for you. I was surprised more people on here don't anodize considering the amount of aluminum you all seem to work with. CAUTION! Do be mindful of the hazards involved. RULE: ALWAYS pour acid into water and not water into acid. I preferred to put the solutions in doubled up tubs to prevent an acid spill should anything happen. And you can replace the inner tub as the solution eventually eats at it. Other people prefer to put a glass container inside of a plastic tub because the acid will not eat away the glass. My problem was that sometimes I was doing large parts like transmission housings. There is also HYDROGEN GAS as a byproduct. Please don't win a Darwin award with a Hindenburg experiment. ;P But simply having a well-ventilated workspace will resolve that. This is by no means meant to cover all the hazards, but just remember what you are working with and common sense goes a long way.

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