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Thread: Fabulous video.....but I cant see how he made the handle

  1. #1
    Senior Member evlwht-guy's Avatar
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    Fabulous video.....but I cant see how he made the handle

    take a look at this!!! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nNEcoBdIsnc&t=605s

    This video is really fabulous. I have always wanted to know how they made iron pots and this shows at least one very slick method. It doesn't have any feet on it as you see with American Pots but otherwise it's the same. [I suspect the feet on American pots are placed there by poking a depression in the mold after it is rammed up and the pattern is removed.] The one thing that they did not show in the video at all as how they cast the handle on the lid if you look at the video starting at about 9 minutes and 16 seconds they start making the lid to the pot. Why in the world he didn't make both molds and cast them at the same time I don't really understand but he certainly has got better skills than I do so why should I question him. At nine minutes and 49 seconds you can see the lid handle in the mold briefly. He has obviously dug down to the top of the pattern so he could put the lid handle pattern on. He then put in the sprue but you never see him take the handle pattern out. At 10 minutes 16 seconds he takes the mold off the pattern and cleans the sprue hole. At 10 minutes 36 seconds he dusts the pattern and you can see that whatever pattern was put in there for the handle is gone and there's just a hole. Does anybody know how the heck he did it?

    My other question is what is all the white powder, is it talcum powder, is it corn starch? And why does he Dust the mold so heavily. I can understand it before the mold is parted but he is dusting it after the mold is parted from the pattern.

    I really liked the use of a feather to clean out sprue holes. We can learn a lot from his "best Practices"

    All in all I'm totally impressed with this video. It is really interesting to see them use just to cope and not a drag in making patterns. They're using The Foundry floor as the drag. I've seen this in Indian commercial Foundry videos as well. It sure saves a lot of time on casting an item that is flat on one side. Or if you have skills like this guy you can do it with an item that's not flat on both sides. Just cope down to it.

  2. #2
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    There's some discussion about it starting at post 246.
    http://www.alloyavenue.com/vb/showth...Casting/page25
    I have to wonder if it would be easier to pre cast the handles and just leave them in the cope.

    Pete

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    Senior Member evlwht-guy's Avatar
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    Thanks for pointing me to the previous discussion.....I really don't think it is put in there pre made and then the metal poured in and somehow sticking to it. I just don't think that would work. I doubt very seriously that a cold part like that in the mold would adhere to the molten metal that came in. It would act as a heat sink...also you can see in the video that there is nothing in the hole.

    It is a shame that such an important step was left out of the video.

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    Senior Member Spelter's Avatar
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    Pretty sure this is what happened:
    sketch of cope cross section with physical model moved around
    IMG_20170108_143625.jpg
    IMG_20170108_143747.jpg
    IMG_20170108_143805.jpg
    IMG_20170108_143820.jpg
    IMG_20170108_144007.jpg

    The guy behind the camera shooting the video wasn't a caster, didn't realise he missed the money shot.
    "The former lives of objects need not interfere with their current use."

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    Quote Originally Posted by evlwht-guy View Post
    Thanks for pointing me to the previous discussion.....I really don't think it is put in there pre made and then the metal poured in and somehow sticking to it. I just don't think that would work. I doubt very seriously that a cold part like that in the mold would adhere to the molten metal that came in. It would act as a heat sink...also you can see in the video that there is nothing in the hole.

    It is a shame that such an important step was left out of the video.
    A shame it is. I saw the holes and the toss of the pattern, so I knew it wasn't premade. They very probably tried it before.
    It seems as though a precast piece with slight flares or flanges could be rammed in and the sand removed from around the flanges to allow them to be captured by the molten metal. I'm sure they have a good reason for not doing that way.

    Pete

  6. #6
    Senior Member evlwht-guy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spelter View Post
    Pretty sure this is what happened:
    sketch of cope cross section with physical model moved around
    IMG_20170108_143625.jpg
    IMG_20170108_143747.jpg
    IMG_20170108_143805.jpg
    IMG_20170108_143820.jpg
    IMG_20170108_144007.jpg

    The guy behind the camera shooting the video wasn't a caster, didn't realise he missed the money shot.
    I think we have our answer. I have seen Lodge brand cast pots with this exact style handle on it. It is amazing how a minor missing shot like that can be the most critical shot of the whole thing. The rest of the video was really wonderful....but this without a doubt would have been the "Money Shot".

    I think that I would want the lid pattern to have 2 dimples in it to guarantee central placement. This guy probably has a little mark we cant see.

    I can see this as an excellent casting contest project!

  7. #7
    I love videos like that if for no other reason than they demonstrate the relative value of craftsmanship versus technology. I think today we often overvalue technology and discount skills. Here's another video, completely different, but it also shows was a true craftsman can do with the most rudimentary technology.
    https://youtu.be/wnv0DAR_gWA

  8. #8
    I HAVE BEEN THERE! Thats the souk in marrakech. I caught some kids in a back alley welding with sun glasses! The next time i visited them, i draged down some welding glasses from germany. I crewed the alternate space shuttle landing site at ben guiere with c130's. Great hard working people. Most actually like us yanks, or atleast they liked our money. ;-) We got to lounge by the pool for weeks when the shuttle broke down prior to launches. Tough work i know. Bought tons of stuff in that market. Everything from leather to wrought iron tables and chairs, stonework and rugs. All handmade and worth every penny.
    Visit me: WWW.HandcraftedLanterns.com
    "Sometimes by losing a battle you find a new way to win the war"
    -- Donald Trump --

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    As far as feet on the pot go, in English history pots with feet were used over a fire, without feet (flat bottom) were for oven use, so I'm led to believe.

  10. #10
    Senior Member evlwht-guy's Avatar
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    Spelter....you were correct..I found a different video with the money shot...and then some, he used the handle to feed the casting as well. see https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fma_lVCFrLQ start at minute 6.47 to see him take out the pattern. I felt bad for this poor guy...here he is in his little hovel, with a crippled leg, and 2 of his 3 castings fail. Note what he uses for a crucible!!! Some of you young guys with no money could learn a lesson from this poor bastard who doesn't even have a decent 2X4s to make a flask out of!

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