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Thread: Just a day looking for used lathes...

  1. #1

    Just a day looking for used lathes...

    I was looking for a lathe before I started making my own and I still browse the ads even though I'm near completion. And there are some machines that, if I had the money, I would definitely do some bargaining to have them.


    For example, who wouldn't buy such a lathe (just for having it around and maybe come with a use for it)?
    https://www.car.gr/parts/view/6870977/

    https://www.car.gr/parts/photos/6870977/
    1,4 m faceplate diameter, 2 m width of cut, 3 m slide.
    For 2400 euros. Maybe ask for 2000?

    Or who doesn't like something like this (cause these damn things are so relaxing to watch):

    https://www.car.gr/parts/photos/9070656/
    https://www.car.gr/parts/view/9070656/
    For 2200 euros. Maybe ask for 1500?

    Or, my favorite, something like this:

    https://www.car.gr/parts/photos/9177990/
    https://www.car.gr/parts/view/9177990/
    A Craftsman AA109 for 500 euros! Imperial (of course), swing (or diameter?) not sure, 35 cm distance between centers.

    Sadly I could only afford the last one IF it was priced maybe a little more than half. It sounds expensive buying a 50-year-old (?), and probably worn out, piece of machinery that "turns" in imperial units.

    Lots of machinery shops going out of business due to retirement (and the crisis) in Greece. There is a lot of "old steel" looking for new homes.

    I actually might call that guy and see if the lathe is still around...
    I found that trying to find what I need and then make it work with what I have, is more trouble than designing what I want and doing it.
    me

    "Quick decisions are unsafe decisions."
    Sophocles

  2. #2
    Senior Member TRYPHON974's Avatar
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    I wouldn't buy the Craftman, at least not at this price. It's very appealing but it's old, was weak when new and is probably worn out now.
    http://www.deansphotographica.com/ma.../109/109a.html


    The big guy with the 1.4m plate is built like a wooden lathe, those you use to turn giant bowl salad. I don't know what it was meant for, spinning, giant rotors?
    Jack of all trades, master of none.
    http://fournaisedupiton.blogspot.com/

  3. #3
    Senior Member nudge's Avatar
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    That is one BIG lathe!
    If the spelins rong blam the wife!

    How to build a Nudge burner (oil)

  4. #4
    3D, if I were you, I'd be looking for an Atlas or Atlas-built Craftsman lathe. The Craftsman's used a 101 prefix model number. I have a Craftsman 101-07403, 12x24 lathe that does me quite nicely. Inital purchase was $300 USD, but it was missing a fair number of needed parts, so at this point, I've got about $1000 USD total in it.
    The beauty of having one of the 101 series, is that Clausing, in Michigan, owns the rights to the Atlas lathes, and they still make new parts. There's also a fair used parts market, and there's always pieces listed on Ebay.
    Depending on your needs, you might just want an old Atlas 618, (6"x18") Look for one that does not have bolts holding down caps for the headstock spindle. Those are old-style babbit bearings, while a solid cast housing is Timken, tapered-roller bearings. (Not saying babbit bearings are bad, but it is old technology.)

    Roger

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by TRYPHON974 View Post
    I wouldn't buy the Craftman, at least not at this price. It's very appealing but it's old, was weak when new and is probably worn out now.
    http://www.deansphotographica.com/ma.../109/109a.html


    The big guy with the 1.4m plate is built like a wooden lathe, those you use to turn giant bowl salad. I don't know what it was meant for, spinning, giant rotors?
    Not sure of the brand or model but it could potentially be used to face off huge castings, like bandsaw tables or something similar. It looks like a DIY lathe composes from a made up headstock and a broken bed from a large lathe. I have ideas of using it as a milling machine to make ways for smaller machines with a bed and slides that big.


    I'd like to have some old lathe at some point. If possible convert it to metric instead of having it just for show. I keep searching, and some pop up occasionally.

    Some guy has a Boxford lathe for sale way over my budget at 900 euros that looks at good shape although i can't find nor he writes down the model.
    I found that trying to find what I need and then make it work with what I have, is more trouble than designing what I want and doing it.
    me

    "Quick decisions are unsafe decisions."
    Sophocles

  6. #6
    I have seen those craftsman 109 lathes sell for $100- $200 dollars in my neck of the woods. I think you possibly may regret it. Once you have it for a few months and start trying to make stuff you will notice how long it takes to make anything while other people are turning and facing within a minute. Just my two cents...

  7. #7
    I think boxford is a decent brand, Ive seen quite a few people using them and have never had any trouble with them. They seem pretty rigid also from the looks of them. I have an ancient monarch lathe, and I think any used lathe, you'll have some trouble with it, but the bigger ones like that boxford would work out better for you. It does look like an earlier boxford lathe tho, no power feed of any sort, and most lathes that size that I see usually have power feed for the cross slide and travel of the bed.

    Ive found that even my monarch isnt big enough for some of the projects I want to do and for most hobby users, I would look for at least a 9" swing. You mention about wanting a metric lathe, most of the blueprints for things that I see, most is in imperial, even stuff that is being drawn up and made across the pond in europe. I havnt really found many projects that were metric only tbh.

  8. #8
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    Stick to the used industrial market. Not just monster lathes in that neck of the woods.

    I bought a Myford Super 7 for $400cdn. Thats like $2 anywhere else in the world...lol.

    Patience is a virtue and buying used machinery at bottom feeder prices is test of will.
    FLAME ON...!!!!

  9. #9
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    Are they sure that is a boxford? It looks like it was made in the 20's whereas Boxford only got started just before WWII.
    Whoever ones it obviously looks after it. It can't be easy to keep rust away from machinery in Greece, but this owner keeps the machine very clean and well oiled. That's no guarantee that the other 15 previous owners didn't wear it out though.

    Here this would only be worth €200-400 but that wouldn't stop someone asking €900 for it. I wouldn't put much stock on the asking price. He is not going to have buyers lining up at his door. It probably has rather limited max spindle speed. NMaybe 800rpm or so, which is limiting for small work.
    Mark

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