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Thread: FMSC Master ProtoWax

  1. #1

    FMSC Master ProtoWax

    Has anyone used FMSC's Master Protowax https://www.freemansupply.com/produc...ck-size-blocks

    Looks interesting had a chance to get a 2"x3"x7" block for just the cost of shipping. Wondering if there's any special precautions or things I need to know about it. Pitfalls that kind of stuff. I have no clue how or what to use it on...just playing.

    Thanks,
    CBB

  2. #2
    Senior Member Spelter's Avatar
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    Very low expansion wax on warming, zero investment cracking on burnout. Clean machining but needs a light touch, softens slightly at body temperature. We ended up not using it because of a slight ash residue at the bottom of the pattern space.This was in a jewelry shop where metal quality was paramount, microscopic inclusions were impermissible, in an ordinary shop the slight ash may be imperceptible.My favorite machining wax.
    "The former lives of objects need not interfere with their current use."

  3. #3
    Thanks for the link. I wanna try their silicone.
    WWW.TheHomeFoundry.org
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  4. #4
    Senior Member Spelter's Avatar
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    I use their bluesil 3470 at work. It takes rigid urethanes being cast against it better than anything else I've found. Benefits from vacuum debubbling. Tear resistance could be better. Can be sanded to take down minor imperfections.
    "The former lives of objects need not interfere with their current use."

  5. #5
    Thanks Spelter. For the type of things I'm likely to cast...a tiny amount of ash isn't a deal breaker.
    Jag... if you live close to Chicago or one of the other Freeman offices they have different casting classes every couple of months (all cold casting, resins, silicone etc) some of them have a cost (like $50) to cover the materials and you get a casting kit out of it. I haven't went as the closest one is 8ish hours away from me and they are always when I have other things going on. but if your new to the silicone/resin casting it maybe worth the $$

    CBB

  6. #6
    Thanks bob. The closest I've got is smooth on in the dallas area. They too run classes. Anything to get you to drop some duckets in their store. I'm going to give this rebound 25 a shot on my little jewelry box with a plaster mother mold. I only need one of these boxes and if my balls were bigger, I'd just shell the wax and go for it. Already got too many hours to risk it, so I better mold the thing. lol
    Jason
    WWW.TheHomeFoundry.org
    Visit me: WWW.HandcraftedLanterns.com
    "Sometimes by losing a battle you find a new way to win the war"
    -- Donald Trump --

  7. #7
    Senior Member Jammer's Avatar
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    http://www.alloyavenue.com/vb/showth...highlight=usmc

    I'm reposting this old thread to show a problem with platinum based silicone mold material from Freemans. They were no help at all and told me I should have tested it first and wouldn't send me another sample kit to try. I haven't dealt with them since. I use Poly-Tek now, these guys are great. Last year they sent me tickets for a concrete show in Nashville and it was great. Yes, they have concrete shows, some of the new stuff is pretty amazing. They use polyurethane based rubber to make molds for concrete. I had hoped they would have a sample I could get while I was there but they didn't bring any. It is what I used at the end of the above thread. I still have the mold, it holds up great and I've made some 2 part molds with it too.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Spelter's Avatar
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    Platinum cure silicones are touchey, especially the slower ones. They don't like sulfur compounds, tin cure silicones, most urethane rubbers, vinyl rubbers, rubbers cleaned with citrus based cleaner...

    I recently had a problem with a mold for silicone where the mold was a known acceptable urethane rubber, which had been molded over a known acceptable clay that was applied over an incompatible vinyl. Plasticiser dissolved out of the vinyl into the clay and subsequently into the urethane causing inhibition in the silicone. Weeks of work and a whole product line were in question until I figured it out. Fortunately, Smooth-on's Inhibit-X saved the day.
    "The former lives of objects need not interfere with their current use."

  9. #9
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    I tend to avoid the various silicones for just the reasons you stated, and too, their need for extremely accurate weighing of the components, and the air bubble problem requiring vacuum debubbling. Granted the polyurethane I use (Smooth-On Reo-Flex) has its own set of hazards: it sticks tenaciously to most everything (except silicone), and it emits a gas that irritates the nasal passages and throat for which I wear a respirator. On the plus side, it is bubble free; it costs half as much as silicone; and it is fairly forgiving if I don't get the measurement exactly right.

    Richard
    When I die, Heaven can wait—I want to go to McMaster-Carr.

  10. #10
    To be honest... I'm a fan of the Smooth on guys. Always helpful and seem to have a product to save the day. Not that I use much silicone. Most of my stuff was tin cure as it's a lot less picky and I only needed it to last a few pulls for small projects.

    CBB

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