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Thread: New Engine Build

  1. #31
    yea, they're usable for sure, but with the slide valve messed up, Ill have to get creative to make another somehow.

    I love my shaper, that thing gets more use than my furnace or my lathe does in all honesty. The stuff I can do with it is insane, and it's easy to make tooling for it, and if you need a custom tool, just grab a piece of cheap HSS lathe bit, shape it to how you want it, and thats it. No need to worry about ordering expensive cutters, and to resharpen them, since you made them, you can easily resharpen them, lol. I have around a half of a large toolbox of equipment for the shaper alone, and it really hasnt cost me anything except time. I honestly dont know what I'd do without it, and I know for sure that I wouldnt trade it for a bridgeport for anything, lol.

    The part that has me worried about is boring out the cylinder. I finally got my lathe fixed today, but a bit of a problem has me stumpped. My nut for the shaper vise snapped because the original was made of cast brass, which was really weak. I then made a replacement part since my lathe was out of commision by just welding a 1/2" nut to a piece of threaded rod, and yesterday, the weld snapped since I didnt mean for it to be permanent. Anyways, I made a new one out of a piece of steel I found on the railroad tracks, It was very hard steel, but cut pretty nicely, but now Im at the last part of needing to cut the threads in the thing, and the steel is so hard that I cant even get the tap to even start. I think it may be tool steel of some sort, but it can be cut pretty easily with a HSS bit, drilling is a little more difficult, and tapping seems to be impossible. Im starting to think that Im just going to need to just throw it in the bonfire or the furnace and get it to annealing temp and let it cool in the fire or the furnace. Im not sure what to do with it, but would really like to get it done since I had gotten every part of it finished except that.

  2. #32
    Senior Member cjcaster's Avatar
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    If you get stuck, tell me what you need and I will send it to you in a flat rate box.
    I have a considerable amount of scrap steel, fasteners, etc, and flat rate boxes are cheap.
    Smarter, not harder.

  3. #33
    Im good, I just need to figure out how to tap it is all, lol. I have plenty of scrap steel around here, but Ive gotten to this point and really dont want to have to do it all over again, lol. Thanks for the offer tho.

    Edit: I just used my old trick, if it wont work, you just need more heat, lol. I blasted the crap out of it with the torch and it did nothing, I then blasted the crap out of it with the burner from my furnace, it turned bright orange almost yellow color, and started to burn the steel, I stopped and let it cool down to room temperature, then tried tapping it again. I managed to get it just soft enough to tap a thread in it. Now I have my shaper vise fixed and I know 3 things now. That s**** is going on the shelf as a reminder never to mess with that stuff again, everything here on out is a piece of cake to machine compared to that, and that that leadscrew nut will outlast that shaper vise and shaper, lol. The way I take care of stuff, that wont be happening during my lifetime, lol...

    Anyways, the shaper vise is fixed again, but this time, it should be fixed for good, and I can get back to working on steam engine parts.
    Last edited by cae2100; 05-26-2017 at 05:59 AM.

  4. #34
    Senior Member cjcaster's Avatar
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    Good deal.
    Glad you got it worked out.
    Smarter, not harder.

  5. #35
    Well, I figured it is time for an update, lol. I got the ports drilled, everything milled out how I wanted it. I got the steam passages done, they came out right in the middle of the steam ports, which I was very glad to see that happen, lol. I also bored the cylinder out, which the bearings in my headstock of my lathe has some wear in them, so it was a little bit out of round when I bored the hole, but not very much. I figured I could just do it out with the cylinder hone or something. I also got the cylinder lapped now, it took all of the taper from the lathe not being perfectly level and took out the oval bore and made it perfectly circle again.

    I had quite a bit of trouble getting the cylinder honed, mainly because every time I went to get a cylinder hone, either the place didnt carry it, or wanted 40-50 dollars for the hone, which was way out of my budget. I thought about just lapping it but no auto parts store I went to had any lapping compound in stock, so I was kinda getting frustrated. I finally came home, contacted all of the family members that works on cars and none of them had one or just BS'd me around, so I finally went out, sat down, and went to outsmart the problem, lol.

    I ended up grabbing 2 pieces of 2x4 lumber, just little cutoff pieces that was in the junk pile, put a few screws in it and stuck it in the lathe. I turned it down to a slip fit of the cylinder bore and made a split lap for the cylinder. I couldnt get ahold of any lapping compound, and I knew some cleaning supplies tend to break down as they're getting used. I ended up grabbing my container of bon amee, or however you spell it and mixed it with mineral oil (baby oil) to make a paste. I put that on the lap and it worked great, lol. I put a t-shirt over the lathe bed ways and just lapped it by sticking a wood bolt in the end of the lap to expand it out and ended lapping all of the machining marks and imperfections out of it and left a perfectly smooth surface. It actually feels like it's made of glass right now.

    I didnt realize the lapped surface would make such a difference, lol. I put the piston with the cast iron rings in it and usually, it doesnt take much effort to push it through the bore, but took a little. This time, I tried pushing it like normal, and it slid so freely now that the piston just popped right out the other end of the cylinder, which amazed the crap out of me how freely it was moving, then it occured to me that the piston just popped out of the other end of the cylinder and all of the effort of getting the stupid rings into the cylinder, I would have to do it all over again. Happiness soon turned to frustration, lol.

    With it being so smooth now, I was thinking of replacing the cast iron rings with teflon rings so it would get less friction, less wear, and higher compression, I found some of my 3mm PTFE teflon tubing today that I am going to make some rings out of. I had it left over from when I was making my own 3d printer hotends, so it is very low friction, and everything glides over it. I figured it would be perfect for a piston ring, and the ID would let a little bit of deflection, but enough to act as a little bit of springiness so it will act almost like an O ring, but made of teflon, and always keep contact with the walls.

    Here's some pics of the lap and cylinder finish.
    DSC05477.jpgScreenshot at 2017-06-04 03:27:48.jpg

  6. #36
    Senior Member cjcaster's Avatar
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    Cylinder looks great.

    That is a good idea on the hone.
    The hones I have purchased at the automotive store don't hold up well (the stones fall off pretty quickly when exposed to oil), and they don't do a very good job of honing either.
    Smarter, not harder.

  7. #37
    Well, the cylinder is pretty much done except making studs for it and the steam chest part. I decided to go with the brass piston after all and I had poured the piston far too cold, which caused it to have all kinds of pockets in it, so I just machined away as much as I could to get underneath of them without taking too much off. The piston has a few surface defects, but it's solid all the way through really. The bore is polished from the hone that I used, and the end covers are all machined up and assembled. I made them slightly too small due to a brainfart, I set the stop on the cross slide, and it was rubbing on the cross slide as I was cutting, so I moved the compound slide in a little bit to stop that. In the process, I pretty much threw the settings on the stop out the window and when I tried machining up to the stop, it came out around 3/32" gap around the outside of the cylinder body, so there's a slight lip around the end caps. You cant really see it unless you look for it.

    I used some brass pipe plugs for now until I can recreate them in red brass, or find some red brass pipe plugs to replace them. (red brass is also known as gunmetal, which makes some pretty good bearing surfaces) I think it'll work for now, expecially when it'll just be used to hold the packing material really.

    Anyways, enough talking, here's the pics.
    DSC05512.jpgDSC05517.jpgDSC05526.jpgDSC05529.jpgDSC05535.jpg

    I may take a short break from this to build a crucible big enough to do the body, but still fit my furnace, and work on trying to pour the body again. I also need to repour the steam chest and cover, which I modified the patterns a little bit to match the cylinder.

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