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Thread: The PITA that is WAX

  1. #131
    What's the expression?? No photos or video it didnt happen? My wife shot this. Looks like it's time to toss out my 4year old "hd" video camera. My phone would have done a better job. Oh well, sorry for the low light, but hopefully I don't look like too big of a goof here. I will admit I was a bit nervous with so much time invested in this little box. I did place cardboard under the crucible before lighting the furnace and as the temp came up, I slowly added bronze. When I went to pull the crucible, the plinth was sticking to it! I was able to twist the crucible off the plinth. All in all, I see room for improvement, but for a cobbled together setup, it worked!

    Enjoy!


    Jason
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  2. #132
    SO the STINKY liver of sulfur showed up today. I shaped the legs and tig welded the crack and the void under the bottom from the main sprue. To index the top to the base, I decided to do what we do with jewelry. I tig welded up balls on the corners of the lid and then fit the base to accept the lid. It's nice and tight and fits a treat. On to the liver...
    The instructions say to mix 1oz of LOF to 1 quart hot water. Well, I didnt need a QUART so I measured out 5grams and added about a pint of water. With the metal cold, I brushed it on with a chip brush and saw brown for about 2 seconds then it went pretty dark black and that was it. Hmmm... I then knocked back most of the dark stuff with a wire wheel and sprayed a coat of clear on it. I'm not sure about the color yet. It's growing on me, but the wife loves the look. She says it's a modern spin on boring old dark brown looking bronze. She might be right. I'm interested to see what you guys think? I didnt find much on the liver on the net. Some say heat the metal, others say do it cold. I have no idea how fast this reaction should take place. Mine happed REALLY FAST, which makes me think I goofed somehow. Anyway.. I'm all ears. DO we like it or hate it? Bring it on, I can take it. It would take no time at all to whip it back into the blast cabinet and try again.
    thanks!
    Jason

    Patina1.jpg
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    WWW.TheHomeFoundry.org
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    "Sometimes by losing a battle you find a new way to win the war"
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  3. #133
    Senior Member Robert's Avatar
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    So damn impressive. You guys rock...
    Jag- that crucible looks too hot. What was the reading on your TC?
    R
    "Whether you think that you can, or that you can't, you are usually right."
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  4. #134
    Moderator DavidF's Avatar
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    B e a u t i f u l ! !
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  5. #135
    Quote Originally Posted by Robert View Post
    So damn impressive. You guys rock...
    Jag- that crucible looks too hot. What was the reading on your TC?
    R
    The chingchong meter read 1150C (around 2100F). My old video camera suxs I know. Judging from the condition of the bronze at breakout. I'd say it was bang on the money. No weird porosity, no strange discoloring, no flaws other than that the one little crack I had and that one I'm blaming on me not filling the pouring cup all the way. Final weight of this little sucker is 4lbs 7oz. NOT LIGHT at all!

    Thanks David. That's one vote for leave the patina. Make it 2 votes. The wife will trump us all! lol

    I'm kinda hoping Richard chimes in and gives me his secret to the black art of patina.
    WWW.TheHomeFoundry.org
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  6. #136
    Senior Member Robert's Avatar
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    Not a criticism but 2100 sounds too hot for regular pouring. 1900 tops. I'm glad you got a good result. Let see what HT says.
    I like the patina!
    R
    "Whether you think that you can, or that you can't, you are usually right."
    - Henry Ford (1863-1947)

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  7. #137
    I should have looked you up last week Robert. I drove through Charlotte on the way to Denver NC. My folks live on lake norman. I ate at the Maggiano's in Charlotte. Excellent clams and linguini.

    The ceramic shells were at 1700degrees F when I pulled them from the kiln. If it was 3mins before I poured, I'd be surprised.
    WWW.TheHomeFoundry.org
    Visit me: WWW.HandcraftedLanterns.com
    "Sometimes by losing a battle you find a new way to win the war"
    -- Donald Trump --

  8. #138
    Quote Originally Posted by Zapins View Post
    Yep the solid stuff that was linked above doesn't last long at all.

    They sell liquid stabilized liver of sulfur that last a few weeks but then after that it doesn't work well.
    Hey Zap, I took the solid stuff from above and stuck it in a glass bottle. Might last a little longer me thinks. Worth a try.
    J
    WWW.TheHomeFoundry.org
    Visit me: WWW.HandcraftedLanterns.com
    "Sometimes by losing a battle you find a new way to win the war"
    -- Donald Trump --

  9. #139
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    beautiful, absolutely beautiful, better than beautiful!!

  10. #140
    I wouldnt be able to use the liver of sulfur fast enough to considering purchasing some so I usually make a sodium equivalent of liver of sulfur which works just as well. If you take a teaspoon of sulfur, they sell it for flowers, and some lye (drain cleaner), just melt the sulfur in a little metal container with a propane torch, and once it's molten, add equal amount of lye, and remelt just mixing the two together with a spoon. If you mix the little bit on the spoon with some water, it'll give more than enough liver of sulfur to patina smaller objects like pendants and such, and works just as well as the commercially sold stuff. You end up with melted bit in the metal container that can be mixed with water to make up plenty more within a short amount of time, or stored in an air tight amber jar to use later. Just make sure to do it outside because the sulfur melting/burning stinks up everything, lol.

    Thats what I used to do for little objects I did in brass, and it worked fine for me for a few years, and as long as you have the lye and sulfur, you can make more and you dont have to worry about a shelf life.

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