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Thread: Wax Burnout Furnace Build - Zapins

  1. #1
    Senior Member Zapins's Avatar
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    Wax Burnout Furnace Build - Zapins

    ***Edit***

    Here it is all finished up




    ***Edit***

    Figured I'd start a build thread on my new wax burnout & holding kiln for lost wax ceramic shell. I am using firebricks that I found at a Lowes. They were $2.56 a brick and are about 9x4," rated at 3000F. I needed 22 in total. What I did was use my diamond saw which I set to about 22.5 degrees and cut the edges off the bricks so they would fit into an octagon. I must have been slightly off on the angle because the bricks fit together into a 9 sided shape which turned out to be perfect. It has a roughly 10" internal diameter and a 12" external diameter. This will fit into my metal furnace shell of about 15" with space to wrap my ceramic blanket around it.

    I started with a 40 gallon water heater a few years ago which I used to make my main furnace, basically I was left with a cutout of sheet metal that I welded back together to make a cylinder that makes up the shell of my new burnout furnace. The 3 inch diameter tube I used for the tuyere was left over from the inside of the water heater. See that thread here if interested: http://www.alloyavenue.com/vb/showth...e+zapins+build



    I welded up a frame to support the furnace and have a place to rest the lid and other things I'll need. Not terribly pretty but oh well. Nice and rigid.



    Here are the bricks in the process of cutting them.


    Here are all the bricks cut and stacked next to the furnace shell. The idea is to stack a full length 9" brick onto a brick cut in half to give about 13 inches in height of furnace when done.


    Here are the bricks stacked and wrapped in wire to keep them together.


    This is what the inside of the furnace looks like


    I welded up a square frame of L shaped steel to act as the lid. I'll attach it to a lever that will help me open the furnace later on.


    More pics to come soon!
    Last edited by Zapins; 01-01-2017 at 05:57 AM.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Robert's Avatar
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    That looks great!!! Simple, elegant, durable. A very unique design with the nonegon! The seams look plenty tight. What are you using for insulation around the brick? If you are using wool or fiberglass, I have a good installation idea for you.
    Robert
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    Senior Member Zapins's Avatar
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    Thanks, I'm going to wrap ceramic blanket from the foundry supply place around it. I can't remember the temperature rating but I think it is around 2700. What was your idea though?

    I need to weld a lot more parts together to make the grate for the bricks to sit in. Then grind the welds and furnace shell and paint it. I got side tracked with moving boxes and stuff out of the back of the garage today so I can expand my workshop back more so I didn't get as much as I had wanted to do on the furnace done. Unfortunately I found a lot of mouse droppings and they ruined a few folders and other things with their nest. Disgusting mess they made. Hope I don't get sick from handling it all.

    Need to swap out some wheels too. I don't want the swively ones I currently have.

  4. #4
    Coming along nicely. Having a shell to make a furnace is quite the start as i found out.
    I found that trying to find what I need and then make it work with what I have, is more trouble than designing what I want and doing it.
    me

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  5. #5
    Senior Member Robert's Avatar
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    I also wrapped my brick assembly with ceramic blanket. To get it in the shell it needed to be compressed. I wrapped the outside with thin aluminum chimney flashing and used to circumferential ropes to hold the flashing in compression. Then I slid the whole thing into the shell letting the rope slide off as I lowered the assembly. Finally I removed the flashing and the wool expanded against the shell.
    I hope I explained that well enough.
    Robert
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    Senior Member Zapins's Avatar
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    _3D_ - yep half the battle is getting the shell put together. I started making this thing about a year ago and I'm only getting around to finishing it now. Having a MIG welder at my disposal now really helps compared with trying to weld with oxy/acetylene (thanks to my friend for lending me his welder!).

    Robert - I'll have to try that out. I had wondered about that part but my main concern was how to do the tuyere opening into the side of the furnace. The bricks are only about 4 inches wide and my pipe is 3 inches wide. That leaves about half an inch of firebrick on either side of the pipe. Not a lot of support. Not sure how I'm going to figure that part out...

  7. #7
    Looks like a winner, what temps are you looking for?
    The only time You're not following your nose is when your going backward!.......Andy (ME) .
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    Senior Member Zapins's Avatar
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    Normal furnace temps I think. I'll be using it to burn out ceramic shell, maybe melt metal, but probably just shell using a propane burner.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Robert's Avatar
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    For the tuyere I took off only one corner of a brick, not centered in a brick. That left more support. But I had more than 1 inch. The wool took up the rest of the space. Would it be feasable to just take out the entire bottom of a brick and have the wool exposed? Or perhaps you could carve an IFB so it would fit around the tuyere and put that in last?
    R
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  10. #10
    The Other option for the tuyere is to take half the pipe size out of 2 blocks. That's roughly 1.5" per block. It should leave you plenty of strength.

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