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Thread: CNC Zyto + Raspberry Pi

  1. #11
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    Ah well, you will have to go ask those nice microsoft people to build a fully functional windows operating system for the Raspberry Pi.
    BTW.
    The " Windows 10 Core" system available for the Raspberry Pi IS NOT a fully functional windows system. It is for development only, so won't run windows software.
    But yes, it would be interesting I guess.
    Cheers
    MrGreg

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by caster View Post
    cae2100, remember that the beauty of a SBC is the ability to use commodity OS (Linux) and commodity IDE (Integrated Development Environment, Eclipse) and program it using C/C++ to access the GPIO pins. Hardware becomes a cheap commodity and software is free modifiable open source. You can run LinuxCNC and drive your CNC machine.

    Caster
    yea, I know, Ive messed with raspberry pi computers since the beginning and actually had gotten a few of the earliest ones, even one or two of the original 10,000, and have made a bunch of robots, and integrated a few into 3d printers and such. (btw, eben is a blast to talk with if you ever get a chance to talk to when he's not being swampped by people, lol) Ive used mint linux (mate) as my main OS on my laptop here for a few years now, and ubuntu 10.04 since it was released before that. I used to make circuit boards all the time for projects, and even designed my own custom boards for the 3d printers so that I didnt have to pay the 80-100 dollars at the time for a 3d printer board, and they're still running perfectly fine, lol.

    I used to do java, c++ and python programming, the java and c++ was for work, but python was more interesting to me due to the fact that it was easily run cross platforms. I was going to make a cnc for the longest time, but one project got in front of another and it just was put on the back burner and eventually forgotten about really, but with increasingly more projects that would benefit a from a cnc router, the time to revisit that idea might be coming sooner than later.

    Thanks mrgreg, I didnt even think about the rpi as a programmer, I havnt done that kind of stuff in forever, but I have a bunch of older programmers that I have thrown into a drawer for programming PIC, AVR, and some for cyrix microcontrollers along with some altera chip programmers for jobs that needed a little more oomph. I used to do alot of high speed data connections and building USB devices, and I know how annoying cross signals from too close of traces or the impediance of the wires can be in high speed communications, lol.

    Thanks again for the info, this stuff is defenitely going in the bookmarks to be used as a reference later when I build mine.

  3. #13
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    Note for Non Electronical - Programm e thingy folks

    This side of things can look rather intimidating if it is not your bag. All the techno talk makes your brain hurt?
    Well there are plenty of people out there who love this sort of thing like electronics clubs and groups etc. So go and seek them out in your locale and cut a deal.
    Go offer to cast something nice and bespoke for them like a plaque or trophy - whatever.
    ( They prob think molten metal is too scary to contemplate)
    There is less than $20 worth of parts in the PiCNC board. An average electronics technician can put this thing together and programm it and get it working with ease. All the clever hard techno stuff has been done. All the software - firmware has been written ( and it's all free). It's just a matter of putting it all together. If you show them all the links I have posted they will understand if they are any good at all.
    Don't be put off. It's not rocket science.
    Good luck

    Cheers
    MrGreg

  4. #14
    Ive seen alot of people on here that are ex-programmers or ex-computer repair people, so I think a bit of the people here would have the programming part down pretty easily. If you look in the thread "who do you think you are", you'll see what I mean.

    I think it's funny about that fact too, it's like everyone is just so sick of fighting with these computers anymore that it's just to the point we just say "BURN IT ALL!!!, ooo, it melted..." heh heh heh

    Then again, thats where most of the aluminum I melted originally came from, old hdds and heatsinks, lol.

    Ive been making circuit boards for quite some time and it is actually pretty easy to make custom boards, but I agree above, there's alot more electronics people out there than you can imagine that would help you.

  5. #15
    Moderator DavidF's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MrGreg View Post
    Ah well, you will have to go ask those nice microsoft people to build a fully functional windows operating system for the Raspberry Pi.
    BTW.
    The " Windows 10 Core" system available for the Raspberry Pi IS NOT a fully functional windows system. It is for development only, so won't run windows software.
    But yes, it would be interesting I guess.
    Cheers
    MrGreg
    Bummer....guess ill have to take a look at the linux cnc... actually its not so much that as it is what my cam program will export. If linuc cnc and g code for mach 3 are compatible I would be in business.
    Just got my first raspberry pi a couple weeks ago and got it up and running no problem. Still much more research is needed. Im not particularly computer savvy, but can read directions. And when that doesnt work i have one big azz hammer
    A calm sea does not make a skilled sailor....

  6. #16
    Moderator DavidF's Avatar
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    But thinking about it, i still have no audio on the hdmi for some reason?
    A calm sea does not make a skilled sailor....

  7. #17
    david, you can either take the SD card out and put it in the computer, or edit it directly on the raspberry pi, but on the computer is easier imo. Look at config.txt file on the base of the boot part of the raspberry pi card, look down through the list and one option will have a # before it and says to force the audio for hdmi or say something about DVI, just remove the #, save it, and stick the card back in the raspberry pi, you should have audio through hdmi then. I just had to do this to my grandfather's rpi to get audio working on his little tv.

    EDIT: It was this option, just remove the # from the beginning of #hdmi_drive=2

  8. #18
    Moderator DavidF's Avatar
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    Will have at it on Friday.....Thanks was having trouble locating the fix.
    A calm sea does not make a skilled sailor....

  9. #19
    Senior Member caster's Avatar
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    DavidF, Intel is getting into the SBC space. There are a few boards being sold (e.g. UDOO). I am a Linux fan but there are reasons to have a windows pc and now there are windows sbcs.

    Caster

  10. #20
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    Well, Anyways, back on topic.
    I previously mentioned an alternative to Machinekit CNC controller which works well on the Raspberry PI v2 and v3.
    To get it to run on a Raspberry Pi you will need to have/aquire some basic linux skills and be able to complie and install from sourcecode.
    I first tried this out circa 2013 on an RPiv1. It ran fine if a little slow and notchy on the GUI. I revisited it this late this year and it ran Fine, just as good as on anything else:
    It's called RTStepper. See Here:

    http://www.ecklersoft.com/

    Basically it is a no frills CNC solution that will run on just about anything. The software is free. The hardware starting at a little over $60.
    The output is a 25pin D connector so will connect directly to a cheap and cheerful chinese stepper driver board using the Toshiba 65xx or 66xx stepper driver chip. One of those will give you 0.5 to 5.0 A outputcurrent which covers most simple things.
    This is a really simple / or basic entry level setup which can be put together with a stepper driver for circa $120.
    You get 3axies and a couple of IOs
    Don't expect it to be as good as Machinekit, LinuxCNC, or Mach3/4
    It is a bit picky about what gcode it will run and is not a realtime system, but it works OK for what it is.
    If you check out the download page you will see that there are precompiled versions for Win 7, 8, & 10, Mac and Ubuntu Linux.
    Beyond the compling (if you need to) it all just plugs together. No PhD in electronics and computer science required!

    I have also complied and run and tested it on one of these:
    http://www.96boards.org/product/dragonboard410c/
    Would prob compile and run on any number of similar spec SBCs as well as rhe Raspberry Pi.

    So, there you go a quick,easy, cheap alternative to a full blown CNC controller & hardware setup.

    Cheers
    MrGreg

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