Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 31

Thread: Unicorns & Green Bay

  1. #11
    My thoughts are a shorter sprue in the belly like the first one, but with a kush head from a steel can to increase the amount of hot metal available and soda straw vents to the surface from the tail, hoof extensions and unicorn?. This makes more hot metal available to vaporize the foam and fill the shape. It's tough not to bobble when the first foam burns, but it is key.
    Good Luck.
    If you think you can't do it, you're right!

  2. #12
    Senior Member cactusdreams's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Canoga Park, CA
    Posts
    539
    Thanks sandcrab. I think you mean kush head the way I mean riser? I use a piece of 4" steel tubing split down the sides with coat hanger wire around it. But maybe a taller one. Do plastic or paper straws matter? I've never used vents and always had good luck with the fumes infusing into the sand from uncoated areas but this could need extra consideration. By "bobble" do you mean pouring fast from the start? I feel confident about that and have to be careful not to overflow the riser.
    People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

  3. #13
    By bobble I mean a break in the pouring flow. If the front face of the metal slows it may freeze and misrun in that appendage (legs in the case of your unicorn). That first one almost poured out.
    The bottom of the kush head could be even with the extensions of the hooves and I usually shorten the foam sprue to be just above the sand. In 51 and 74 of the Indian Head thread you can see the placement. I twisted the head off as soon as it froze for no good reason so the cast sprue is short, but there was a substantial head above the castings.
    If you think you can't do it, you're right!

  4. #14
    Senior Member cactusdreams's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Canoga Park, CA
    Posts
    539
    Prepped my last 2 foamies per the advice and my thoughts.



    D'oh!


    Yippy!


    Really glad this finally came out after 5 tries and time running out before Christmas. Hope it helps someone else learn from my fails. Now to the finishing.
    People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

  5. #15
    Senior Member Tobho Mott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    1,630
    Nice! Glad it worked out so well for you. I wish we did not have so much snow here, as I would like to get in a few more pours before Christmas too...

    Jeff
    Tobho had learned to work Valyrian steel at the forges of Qohor as a boy. Only a man who knew the spells could take old weapons and forge them anew.

    How I built my oil furnace | My Photo Album | My Videos

  6. #16
    Ya got it, now letscsee the final product
    The only time You're not following your nose is when your going backward!.......Andy (ME) .
    Have you filed in "Who do you think you are?" "War Grade Report" " My photo's"

  7. #17
    Senior Member cactusdreams's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Canoga Park, CA
    Posts
    539
    Got the sanding and buffing done but having trouble with some smudges. Used acetone as usual to get the buffing compound off and it worked for the little blobs but there's this dark smudge it doesn't touch. Same for the Packers' G. I sanded with 4 grades of scotchbbrite roloc discs ending with x-fine. Then stitched and loose buff wheels with proper compound for AL. But these smudges won't come off. Anybody know what's up with this? Do I need to back up a couple steps somehow?


    People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

  8. #18
    Moderator DavidF's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Wilmington DE
    Posts
    2,348
    Not sure what you have for a smudge but I usually sand with 600 then go to 1000 then 2000 from there its off to the buffer sewn wheel with black emory, then loose wheel with some white or blue or green LOL havent noticed much of a difference between them..
    Black emory on a sewn wheel works wonders for rapid material removal.....
    A calm sea does not make a skilled sailor....

  9. #19
    Senior Member cactusdreams's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Canoga Park, CA
    Posts
    539
    My compound is just the HF stuff, grey for stitched and green for loose. The mane and tail which weren't sanded as much cleaned up fine. It's just on the smoothest parts and appeared while buffing. You can tell I still have some scratches and boy did the bubbles show up while finishing.
    People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

  10. #20
    Administrator Site Admin
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Huatulco, Mexico
    Posts
    3,023
    You haven't stated what it is you want to accomplish as a finish. I think it a mistake to use buffing compounds on a surface that isn't ready for it. The compound enters into the pores and cracks and crevices, and it won't come out. I have polished a lot of metal, both aluminum and stainless.





    You must get the metal to a smooth uniform finish before buffing or you will have a multitude of tiny traps for the black compound residue to accumulate in. And too, what's the point? If you are not going for a mirror finish? Any shine you achieve just serves to emphasize the inherent roughness.

    For a cast finish, I begin with 150 grit paper, then 220, then 400, then 600. You absolutely must remove all traces of scratches left by the previous grit paper before moving to a finer grit or you will just have polished scratches. Emery compound on a hard sewn wheel will remove 600 grit scratches, so sanding with anything above say 800 grit and then using emery is going backwards. Emery is great on aluminum, but is close to worthless on stainless. It breaks down too fast and you need something with aluminum oxide or such.

    If you do not want to get a mirror finish, there are a lot of abrasive wheels that give a nice satin or matte finish that doesn't show the imperfections so much. You won't find them at a big box store. McMaster-Carr has them.

    Richard
    When I die, Heaven can wait—I want to go to McMaster-Carr.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •