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Thread: Tiny foundry ( 3D printed models involved )

  1. #1
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    Tiny foundry ( 3D printed models involved )

    Hello all!
    I have found out this forum a few days ago and thought I'd share my experience with You in the meantime while reading tons of great stuff here.
    I built my furnace about two years ago already but since then have not so many projects that I worked on sadly.



    My grandfather run a local small iron foundry years ago and even though I was too little to ask and learn, but somehow he get me inspired to try it myself... on a smaller scale ofcourse. So here I am.

    Now, a little bit about what I've done lately.
    This is a project going on my mind for a long time. As an owner and forum member of XTZ750 Yamaha model I found out that some of the parts are really hard to get or available for sick prices.
    Thought that I can try to make my own, better parts - mostly to help the others, but would be nice to get back my invest in propane gas and atleast smaller part of time spent on it. ( I may fail here but will see )
    One of the parts are chain pullers fixed to the end of swingarm. Most of them crack in half ( while adjusting chain without loosing nuts ) and are almost impossible to get from second hand.

    Designed new thicker pullers and casted them last saturday :

    Half of the flask is done ( 3D printed model inserted, each model is divided )



    Molten aluminium is the poured into the mold



    Went out pretty good ( I need to get a strainer for my casting sand as it is not as fine around the model as I wish it would be)



    Castings after cutting out sprues, grinding and polishing. Didn't like that look so I brushed it later on.
    What I've learnt here is that a drill press is a must, holes turn out to be not in the centre.



    Here is an assembled cap :



    More to come soon.

  2. #2
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    Very nice, your Grandfather would be proud of you.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Tobho Mott's Avatar
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    Since you have molten metal in your blood already, I guess I should not be surprised. And yet I am - your first post and it's a vehicle part replica, already cast, finished, and installed no less! Quite the grand entrance, you'll fit right in here!

    The parts look great, welcome to the forum!

    It'd be really cool to see any old pictures from your grandfather's foundry if you have any. Or new pictures of any of his old equipment, if your family managed to hang onto any of it!

    Looking forward to seeing what else you can do (no pressure, but you did say "more to come"... )

    Jeff
    Tobho had learned to work Valyrian steel at the forges of Qohor as a boy. Only a man who knew the spells could take old weapons and forge them anew.

    How I built my oil furnace | My Photo Album | My Videos

  4. #4
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    That's a unique way of gating. When I saw the double gates, I thought you were using both for input. That was a lot of metal flowing through the mould cavity. Glad it worked for you. Very nice work.
    Bones

  5. #5
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    Thank You all for good words. Well old foundry is still in the area I used to live at, it works now as an old military vehicles ( mostly trucks ) repair workshop. Will look for some old pictures next time when I visit my parents.
    Still remember some toys my grandfather cast for me - like a simply shaped jet plane. He cast a lot of lead soldiers' molds for my father out of aluminium as well. I have two molds that have been given to me. If any of You tried to cast lead soldiers I may already advice You to "smoke" the inner surface of the mold using a candle. Helps a lot.

    Well I had some problems in the past with trapped air in my molds so I just let the metal flow from one side of the mold to the other. Still not perfect solution with these gates but goal was to reduce spots I will need to polish to only one surface. The perfect solution would be to have them on the side that goes inside the swingarm's tube. I'd like to cast like 3 sets of these caps tomorrow and I need to find a good placing pattern to be sure metal will flow throught all of these gates. Pictures guaranteed.

  6. #6
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    If you are going to be making a few more of these caps, (and maybe you could sell some) it would be worthwhile making matchplate patterns. Especially if it becomes a regular thing.

    cheers Phil
    So, whats your Plan B?

  7. #7
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    12bolts, that's a good idea, never thought about it until today. It would save me a lot of time. Got to read about it a little.

    Casting on Saturday did not have a place due to rainy autumn weather lazyness. Time has not been wasted though, made another set of caps for casting.



    Prepared one more yesterday, finished at 3.00 am, polishing took more than was planned.



    Tried my luck again today, with all of the sets I have. Took awhile before I figured out how to arrange them inside of my small flasks.






    As was mentioned before, there is quite a lot of metal going through these small gates but hell, why not try to push it through even more of them?






    Unfortunately I made small, stupid mistake and just after I started to pour aluminium, it went thought the gap and straight on the floor. Cursed a lot, but tried to pour on the other side of the mold.






    Amazingly it went out pretty good. Middle cap is not fully detailed but I'm still satisfied because of that.






  8. #8
    Very nice work!

    What techniques do you use to finish the 3D Printed patterns and what material are you printing? It looks like you got a good surface finish on the castings. It always takes me a lot of time post processing my 3D printed pattern so I'm always interested in what others do. I print either abs or pla, neither of which seems to sand that great. I have been filling in the ridges with automotive bodywork glazing putty followed by hand sanding, primer, and more sanding.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Robert's Avatar
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    Very nice. good demo!
    r
    "Whether you think that you can, or that you can't, you are usually right."
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  10. #10
    Very nice. You could simplify the gating, but weight on the cope or even a clamp would insure six castings.
    If you think you can't do it, you're right!

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