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Thread: r4z0r7o3's Crucible-furnace lifting mechanism / transport-stand.

  1. #211
    Senior Member r4z0r7o3's Avatar
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    Talking Update

    (pics to follow once I have a nice collection)

    The error was too great to fix by trimming the wooden spacers, so I made a new pair. After my second trim+refit with them, the error is now under 1-in. Since the carriages (assemblies with the wheels) have 1/16-in of clearance to the rail-sides, my "wiggle room" out at end ends of the arms is pretty small, perhaps 1/4-in or so.



    In order to be able to increase the width between the rails, I'll need to do a little trimming on the platform sides. Then I can fit up some more spacers, increasing the width until I get the arms fitting well on the studs. It's tedious and time-consuming work, but I only need to do it once, then can get on with making/welding up all the support pieces.
    "Things that are complex are not useful, things that are useful are simple."
    - Mikhail Kalashnikov

  2. #212
    Senior Member r4z0r7o3's Avatar
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    Sorry guys/gals, it's been a while.

    After suffering through two pre-winter colds, having my front-door go missing, finding it, having it repaired (at "borrowers" expense), and dealing with a head-lice infestation (is it school, or is it a petri-dish for bugs and viruses)...I did manage to eek out a few minutes here and there of garage time, and snap pics along the way.

    Beginning with a set of extension pieces to glue on the sides of my new spacers, so I can trim them more accurately. Simple feather-board setup.


    Left these to dry for about a month before getting around to trimming them square and parallel.


    Welded up a simple saw-aligning jig to help me cut the short-sides off the vertical rails, so they can be mounted onto the base-frame but adjusted in/out with spacer-plates (coming next).




    Bend up...


    ...down...


    ...snap!


    Cleaned up the bottom edge, measured really carefully so both rails are exactly the same.
    "Things that are complex are not useful, things that are useful are simple."
    - Mikhail Kalashnikov

  3. #213
    Senior Member r4z0r7o3's Avatar
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    Sorry guys/gals, it's been a while.

    Recycling the sawing jig to help get a good size bolt-hole pattern. Washers used to help judge hole-size and placement.




    The rectangle-tubing I'm using has 3/16th in. thick walls, so the way it works out, I need exactly five 1/8th iin. spacers, plus the base-platform's angle-iron, to fill the interior gap and distribute the clamping pressure. This also allows me to adjust the distance between rails by 1/8th in. increments. I made the spacers by corner-welding a stack together, and using the just made rail-mounting holes to mark them.


    Drilled out the stack in the marked locations.


    Popped off the top one to use as a template for the second set of five (later).


    Reamed out the holes one-step larger than my bolts.


    Sanded the corners round removes the weld holding the stack together.




    Here's the whole thing, squared up, and clamped with my wooden spacers (giant parallels).


    Close up of how the rails mount. Notice they don't touch the bottom, instead the upright bit of angle iron rests on the top of my notch. Those are SS bolts, so I can torque the crap out of them to get a good squeeze onto the angle-iron as well...


    ...but, it's still going to need some bracing. After a few hours fussing about how long they needed to be, I cut one on the bandsaw. Used that as a template to make a bunch more about the right length (didn't even measure).


    Lined up one side of the stack, and trimmed them all to the right length all at the same time.


    The braces will be welded to a piece of angle-iron, then the other end welded directly to my platform. This way I can make up some more 1/8th in. spacers for mounting to the rails, so it all stays adjustable. You can see on the bottom edge is a little jig I made from scrap to help align the braces to the angle so the pair is an exact match.


    Welding the neighboring brace was a bit fiddely, needed to use a few magnets


    Here's a closeup how it looks mounted to the rail. I need to do some minor trimming for a better fit, then I'll weld them onto the base platform.


    I also cobbled together a piece of angle-iron and strange-angle brace for mounting the top-rail. These will also get a set of 1/8th in. spacers.


    Overview of the assembly so-far. Next I'll be coming up with a way to attach the arms together, along with some more bracing, and 1/8th in. spacers all around for adjustment.
    "Things that are complex are not useful, things that are useful are simple."
    - Mikhail Kalashnikov

  4. #214
    The blue marking pen? (Post # 127) Where can they be bought?

    I could use a couple for *my* welding projects.

    Dennis
    Last edited by den; 12-19-2016 at 12:50 AM.
    Ouch! That stuff's hot!

  5. #215
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    I think it's just a style of soap stone mechanical pencil....

    A flex of my GoogleFu lead me to this though: http://www.markal.com/welding-marker...arker-silver-/
    FLAME ON...!!!!

  6. #216
    Senior Member r4z0r7o3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by den View Post
    The blue marking pen? (Post # 127) Where can they be bought?
    I could use a couple for *my* welding projects.


    It's a Markal Silver-Streak, you can get 'em on amazon, along with the refills.. They work awesome ontop of mill scale / rust or other dark backgrounds.

    Terrible against shiny/ground steel. The Markal Red Riter is wax-based garbage, doesn't work. I haven't found a good solution for light/reflective color materials other than a sharpie or paint marker. Main trouble with both sharpie / paint is it burns off by the slightest heat, even just from a belt-sander. The silver-streak marks are heat-resistant, and they even glow a bit under your welding hood.

    If anyone knows something that shows up on reflective metal and is heat resistant, I'm all ears!

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by J. Vibert View Post
    I think it's just a style of soap stone mechanical pencil....

    A flex of my GoogleFu lead me to this though: http://www.markal.com/welding-marker...arker-silver-/
    Lol, spot-on. Should have read the next post before replying hahahahaha.
    "Things that are complex are not useful, things that are useful are simple."
    - Mikhail Kalashnikov

  7. #217
    Senior Member r4z0r7o3's Avatar
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    Question Brace welding and uggg, holes!

    Now that I've got a few weeks off work, I gone done burned through all my remaining Argon. Thank god the shops aren't yet closed for the holidays!

    Anyway, I welded up the 45* braces yesterday onto the base platform. Was REALLY tricky to do since the square tube is like 18-ga but the platform is 3/16-in. The tubing would basically disintegrate w/ my TIG at 80-amps if I held it more than a second. Really had to focus the arc on the base-plate, build up a oversize puddle, and "drag" it up onto the square-tube with my filler-rod. Wait 0.948367366 seconds until it just started to "sink" then get the hell outta there!

    Bad news...errr...fabrication lesson:

    Either-

    Use your drilled holes & bolts to anchor your part for welding the other end.

    -or-

    Weld the other end, then drill the holes for the bolts.




    Having not thoroughly learned this lesson yet, I drilled the holes first. Found only 1-1/2 of the 3 actually line up when the part was placed. Said f'it and welded anyway. Now what to do about the 2-1/2 miss-aligned holes. They're right below this one (the one that lines up):



    (Drilled first, as in all the way through the vertical rails and everything)

    *cry*




    Options I thought of:
    1. Leave it, 1-1/2 bolts is good enough for the 45* braces. There are three more bolts tying the rails to the base-platform.
    2. Tape up the holes, fill the rectangle tube with argon, and try and weld 2 of the holes closed, one at a time. There's no way to get a copper backing plate up in there.
    3. TIG-braze two of the holes closed
    4. Make all the holes bigger. There will be five 1/8 thick shims/spacers clamping everything together anyway.
    5. Grid off the 45* braces. Buy some more of the nice 1/8-thick square tubing (used everywhere else), and fit the new braces to the old holes before welding.


    Note: I dunno bout others, but I *have* learned that drilling through ER70S3 weld-blobs really really really sucks. I do have a pile of coat-hangers though

    Anyone else got better ideas or thinks one of the above is good?
    "Things that are complex are not useful, things that are useful are simple."
    - Mikhail Kalashnikov

  8. #218
    Uh, (it's been nearly thirty years since I did any tig...) - perhaps plug th' holes with weld, then grind flush and try again? (As was done at one place I worked at when the machinist(s) put holes in the wrong place?)

    I recall this because I was one of the machinists in question, and Rick (the welder) complained about it...

    Regarding 'hard spots' (due to ER70-s3 application) - slow speeds, a *cobalt* drill-bit of acceptable manufacture, cutting oil / fluid, and moderate pressure *should* help some.

    Dennis
    Ouch! That stuff's hot!

  9. #219
    Senior Member r4z0r7o3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by den View Post
    slow speeds, a *cobalt* drill-bit of acceptable manufacture, cutting oil / fluid, and moderate pressure *should* help some.
    Trust me, it double-sucks when you're both the machinist and welder.

    It's felt more like trying to drill glass :S Mos. def, need to go slow and keep it cool.

    I think I may braze them closed, and grind the braze flush. Much easier to drill then. Though getting some more skookum square-tubing, grinding the crap off, and using the holes I made is gaining ground (options wise). The thin-wall stuff is okay strength-wise, it's just a PITA to weld onto such a thick plate.
    "Things that are complex are not useful, things that are useful are simple."
    - Mikhail Kalashnikov

  10. #220
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    Sometimes the longest way round is the quickest way home..............

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