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Thread: r4z0r7o3's Crucible-furnace lifting mechanism / transport-stand.

  1. #131
    Senior Member r4z0r7o3's Avatar
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    Heh, can't do this with wood!

    First of all, my welds are completely gone, all has become one Unfortunately, I was not able to control the distortion as well as I had hoped for (some was intentional). Some "libs" ended up distorting slightly more/less than others. No matter, I still have ye'olde O/A toarch!


    I averaged 2.3 hammer-and-check cycles per "lib" against my jig to get them corrected. It was fairly simple, I just heated up the joint, and hammered on the opposite edge I wanted it to move (you can see my cheater-arrows)


    They're not lying completely flat, and my macro lens is causing some distortion, but I promise, the "libs" of the F's are all lined up w/in probably 1/32 - 1/16 of eachother at the far ends. This is good enough, since I'm going to be trimming them roughly in half anyway.




    Still workin' on how I'd like to mount the casters to the base platform. I can't weld them even if I wanted to, because they all have grease-fittings and bearings that would get cooked.

    So some kind of adapter-plate and stubby-little extension legs are called for. Just not sure if I should use 1-in angle-iron stumps (three per corner) or spring for some 3 or 4-in square-tubing...that I'd then need to cut down :S

    Leaning toward the angle-iron just for the ease-of-cutting factor.
    "Things that are complex are not useful, things that are useful are simple."
    - Mikhail Kalashnikov

  2. #132
    Senior Member r4z0r7o3's Avatar
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    Cool Onward!

    There's 1/16-in (0.0625) of clearance between the carriage insides and the rail-sides. That clearance is built into the carriage by the combination of washers and adjusted spacers (several posts/pages back). However, the carriage arms (sticking out parts of the "F") are to be welded is 1-in square-tube, so they need spacers added.

    I picked up a sheet of 16-ga (0.0598) CRS from a big box, then went to town with my Wiss snips. Technically they're only rated for up to 18-ga, so I took it slow, small nibbles at a time.


    Contact area between the arms is 2-in long, scribed marks then proceeded to cut the shims to length using...


    ... my hammer Okay, that thing I'm holding in my hand might have played a small part as well.


    I'll be plug-welding these, so holes are needed. Even the Unibit wanted to grab them, but I found an easy way to prevent them from spinning.


    Can Haz NO burz!


    Clean...clean...clean...then scrub...then clean, and clean some more. Re-wrote my labels on all the pieces as I went since they're keyed-together in pairs by the roller-mounting holes being less-than-perfect.


    I weld around the edges of the circle first, then swirl the heat inward, adding filler, and melting the pool into the "F" piece on the bottom.


    All done, ready for cleanup, and almost ready for welding (some more cleaning is required)


    Some of the plug-welds ended up slightly proud of the shim material, so I sanded them all down nice and flat. Also, some of the shim edges stuck out past the welding-chamfers on the sides, so I sanded them down too.


    While I had the sanding disc mounted, I went ahead and cleaned all the mill-scale from the ends of the arms where the "F"'s will be attached.


    Back to my fixture, clamped up on my table-saw. First the arm goes in.


    Then a spacer piece of 1-in square-tube scrap.


    1/16-in (16-ga) shim goes ontop of that.


    Finally the "F"...double-checking that all the labels match.


    There's a scrap of 1x2 tube just holding everything still while I tacked the inside corners. Didn't even use any filler, just melted the edge of the F down into the tube.


    The "F" wasn't lying completely flat, so I clamped it down hard, onto the arm, and then tacked the inside.


    Next I mounted up the rollers, and installed the opposite "F" to complete the carriage assembly.


    Snugged up the bolts & ny-lock nuts good and tight with my impact-driver.


    The fixture/jig on my table-saw is only useful for one-orientation/side. Plus, doing it this way ensures both halves of the carriage are lined up before I tack, and so the slight angular misalignment of the "F"'s won't affect anything once it's all welded up.


    It's an otherwise perfect fit to the rails, there's only just one small clearance issue. You can see it here between the bottom support arm and the SS rail. They don't quite rub, but it's close enough that I'll want to nibble that edge of the arm-tube back before I tack.


    In any case, here's it all clamped up, ready for tacking. I'll need to take it all apart so I can grind out that edge, then re-assemble and tack.


    Each of these arms only needs to support 25-50lb (static) at the end of about a 15-in lever-arm. I plugged these numbers into a torque calculator, then worked it backwards down the 11-in trolley, to get the force applied to the second roller. It comes out at around 67-pounds (worst-case). Both the rollers and the SS-rod track will be able to handle that until all our the jobs come home from China, Mexico, Canada, India, and Pakistan.

    Next the rails will be temporarily mounted to the base, and I'll attempt some lifting tests. If I can figure out how, I'll maybe even do some tests with the acme-screw to see which one I want to use (1/2-in or 3/4-in). I'm also working on some welding of the furnace skins in my other thread here.
    "Things that are complex are not useful, things that are useful are simple."
    - Mikhail Kalashnikov

  3. #133

  4. #134
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    Nice cordless drill...
    FLAME ON...!!!!

  5. #135
    Senior Member 4cylndrfury's Avatar
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    man, you sure made a thing!

    lol, jk. It looks like its coming right along. I wish I had half the fab skills of the crew here!

  6. #136
    Senior Member r4z0r7o3's Avatar
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    "Things that are complex are not useful, things that are useful are simple."
    - Mikhail Kalashnikov

  7. #137
    Senior Member r4z0r7o3's Avatar
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    Having assembled the furnace, now I can get a "live" fit-up of the lifting arms and rails onto the base platform. First it needs wheels though. I know many are of the opinion three is better than four. I've honestly really been struggling a lot with the decision, taking the main argument under serious consideration - three wheels will always self-level.

    However, my base platform has about a foot of extra room in front of the furnace that I plan to use as a work-surface. Also, this is going to be a semi-mobile setup, where it will (at least occasionally) need to cross uneven terrain. So even-though having four-wheels means it will always have a "soft foot", which foot it is is able to change along with varying terrain. Never-the-less, I would like to have some amount of adjust-ability in the legs/wheel height, mostly for leveling purposes (so the furnace drain and lifting mechanism work optimally).

    So, I'm in the process of chopping up oddles of 1-1/2in (bedframe) angle-iron, 5in long, with a hack-saw (yes really). After cleaning them all up to length, I'll cope them to fit together in the standard angle-iron "box" format. Those will get welded to the underside of the platform (at the corners), then threaded rods will go through the bottom ledges to secure the wheels; while, allowing for +/- 2-1/2in of adjustment (by the threaded rod + two nuts).

    Please forgive me for not posting pics of all the cutting / coping in-process. My camera would surly suffer from all my sweat flying everywhere
    "Things that are complex are not useful, things that are useful are simple."
    - Mikhail Kalashnikov

  8. #138
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    That's some pretty welding, not often I've seen anyone tig mild steel. Nice job.

  9. #139
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    Once you have a tig welder, it's the only way to do it...
    FLAME ON...!!!!

  10. #140
    Senior Member r4z0r7o3's Avatar
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    Heh, well thanks guys, though those are mostly just tacks, and I still consider myself quite a n00b.

    Just changed my first 80cf argon bottle, and only tried aluminum the other week for the first time - not as challenging as I was led to believe! Turns out it's super easy to completely screw it up at any time, and "thorough cleaning" doesn't even come close to what's really needed (damn-near clean-room clean).

    One test-piece ended up with some contamination, I didn't realize that's what it was until my puddle and grown from 1/4-in into a silver-dollar size key-hole. Also witnessed, there's an understanding of "heat-conduction difference". Then there's actually seeing it first-hand. Wow. After screwing up a bunch on scrap, figured out that feathering the peddle lower and lower as you go along is much more important than getting the welder set up right (which only seems of medium importance).

    Anyway, I've got half of all the 5-in angle iron cut. Both my arms are sore and I'm running out of hacksaw blades



    Note: DO NOT buy the "new" DeWilt brand blades (Northern Tool _just_ 100% switched to them *cry*). Compared to Lennox they're like trying to cut steel with a cheese-stick :S They work fine at first, then completely turn into mush. Even the paint they use doesn't have the semi-lubricating effect like Lennox.

    Now I got to find a new place to buy the Lennox blades. Even they don't last but 10-20 cuts through bed-frame angle iron (hard, hot-rolled steel). But _way_ better than DeWilt (Grease, rest their soul, use to be a good brand)
    Last edited by r4z0r7o3; 09-24-2016 at 06:13 PM.
    "Things that are complex are not useful, things that are useful are simple."
    - Mikhail Kalashnikov

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