Page 30 of 45 FirstFirst ... 20282930313240 ... LastLast
Results 291 to 300 of 443

Thread: r4z0r7o3's Crucible-furnace lifting mechanism / transport-stand.

  1. #291
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Buffalo, NY
    Posts
    2,652
    You might also want to wait till you have your screw shroud sorted out. A limitation now might not be one later.

    Pete

  2. #292
    Quote Originally Posted by r4z0r7o3 View Post
    Hmmm, why would I split the side? I have access to both screw ends, though the top is easier.
    I was thinking that you could work something out to where the emt nests inside one and other as the lift rises and lowers depending on space. As the thread protector can't be fixed in place with the lift moving up and down it.

  3. #293
    Senior Member r4z0r7o3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Raleigh, North Carolina
    Posts
    1,316

    Baby steps forward

    Quote Originally Posted by CrazyBillyBob View Post
    I was thinking that you could work something out to where the emt nests inside one and other
    Ahh okay, I think I get it, yeah, the travel is too great for, it's got to collapse more than just two EMTs would allow. Though, running with this EMT idea (stuff is almost dirt-cheap), I came up with a possibly workable solution. I can nest a smaller size EMT inside a larger size. On the smaller size, I tack-weld a wire ring on the top and bottom OD. On the larger size, I tack-weld a wire-ring on the top and bottom ID. Something like this ASCII-CAD drawing, repeating:

    Code:
       -o     o-
       |       |
       |       |
       |       |
       |       |
       |O|   |O|
       -o|   |o-
         |   |
         |   |
         |   |
       -o|   |o-
       |O|   |O|
       |       |
       |       |
       |       |
       |O|   |O|
       -o|   |o-
         |   |
         |   |
         |   |
         |   |
        O|   |O
    Here are my research points:
    • Lead-screw is 5/8" dia., so that's 0.625"
    • 3/4" EMT, has ID 0.824", OD 0.922 (+/- 0.005), and wall thickness 0.049
    • 1" EMT, has ID 1.049", OD 1.163 (+/- 0.005), and wall thickness 0.057
    • The Lead-screw, inside 3/4" EMT would have all around clearance of about 0.1" (plenty)
    • 18ga wire is about 0.047", giving about 0.016 all around ID/OD clearance (near perfect)
    • Both EMT sizes are in the $10-15 range for 12+ ft length.


    Quote Originally Posted by caster View Post
    You should give some thought on how you will use the furnace so you can choose the optimal placing of your controls.
    Yep, though not having used it, it's hard to do, though I tried. I finally settled on dangling it off the right side of the top-support. This puts it out of the way, yet w/in arms reach. It's on the burner-side, so that space is otherwise wasted (i.e. I can't stand there). It also keeps it away from all things hot, open or closed, up or down. Finally, that's the side with the limit-swiches, so it'll shorten their wiring a bit.


    Wouldn't you know I picked the absolutely most insane adamantium-grade hard piece of Chinese beadframe. Only way I could drill mounting holes was with a carbide-tipped ceramic bit and the (no-joke) hammer-mode of my drill engaged (not a real SDS hammer-drill mind you). Got two HSS bits to re-sharpen now, but the ceramic-bit actually fared the ordeal well. Even if not, it was a cheapo, $1 one.

    My tentative plan is to run the majority of wire through the right-side rail (1x2 steel tube). However, in an awesome feat of failing-to-plan, hind-sight, un-woopsie, anti-accidents: It turns out I have 10-feet more wire than my dead-reckoning measurements. Totally forgot to take my supply into account, talk about lucky! This silicone wire is pricey enough I may do a few runs of para-cord to double-check, and then later it can serve as fishing-rope. That'll also tell me if it's snagging on anything sharp.

    The PSU will be mounted on the under-side of the platform, on the back (near the motor). There, it's away from heat, and easy to protect while still allowing the possibility for active-cooling if it turns out I need it (probably not).
    Last edited by r4z0r7o3; 03-06-2017 at 10:13 PM.
    "Things that are complex are not useful, things that are useful are simple."
    - Mikhail Kalashnikov

  4. #294
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    2,237
    A regular masonry bit with an edge ground on them will bore through case hardened material fairly well. All in how you grind the carbide though.
    FLAME ON...!!!!

  5. #295
    Senior Member r4z0r7o3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Raleigh, North Carolina
    Posts
    1,316
    Quote Originally Posted by J. Vibert View Post
    A regular masonry bit with an edge ground on them will bore through case hardened material fairly well. All in how you grind the carbide though.
    They were this style bit (upside-down tear-drop shape):


    I did no grinding whatsoever, but did need to use the hammer-mode @ full-throttle, otherwise they wouldn't bite. Was a little worried about the carbide chipping, but it fared okay. All my other bits, even a freshly sharpened 5/8" one just started squealing (at which point I stopped drilling immediately). I could have ground off my tack-welds, and find another piece of angle, but it had a few clearance cuts measured and made already, and I was too lazy to redo them.

    Oh well, at least it's super strong

    I have some really thin-wall square-tubing I'll probably use as 'conduit' in a few places. It's basically useless for much else. Just need a few pieces in spots where the wires are exposed in inconvenient places (due to heat or mechanical or accident avoidance).

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by J. Vibert View Post
    What caster said...

    I've seen a few builds wherein the white hot lid rotates over the fuel lines to the burner. Just an example...
    Oh god! I can only imagine. Totally cringe-worthy. I'm safe here, the lid swings left (from pic above w/ control box on right). Though I guess that precludes putting wooden flasks on the left, oh well.
    "Things that are complex are not useful, things that are useful are simple."
    - Mikhail Kalashnikov

  6. #296
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    2,237
    I meant a regular masonry bit like this:
    main-qimg-58a45a8dc86098767ad0dc4fcfc8829d.png

    All you need to do is grind relief on the carbide tip and it will zip through hardened steel without too much effort. Certainly no hammer function needed.

    I just used the technique on the edge of a press column that had been flame cut. Regular bits just danced along the surface.
    FLAME ON...!!!!

  7. #297
    Senior Member r4z0r7o3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Raleigh, North Carolina
    Posts
    1,316
    Ah, okay. I have some of them, but they're more expensive, didn't wanna ruin them Grind back-relief on them? Will an Al. Ox. wheel do it or must I have diamond?
    "Things that are complex are not useful, things that are useful are simple."
    - Mikhail Kalashnikov

  8. #298
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    2,237
    I have just used a cut off wheel in 4" angle grinder.

    Dollar store types are just as good as big box name brands.

    Your horror freight has sets of five different sizes for $6. Which is of course more than $1pc, but marginally, and i think will give you better results with less effort.
    FLAME ON...!!!!

  9. #299
    Senior Member r4z0r7o3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Raleigh, North Carolina
    Posts
    1,316
    Quote Originally Posted by J. Vibert View Post
    Your horror freight has sets of five different sizes for $6. Which is of course more than $1pc, but marginally, and i think will give you better results with less effort.
    You're right! I found a 1/4" one banging around in a box, ground some back-relief into it and a hole was made I'm not counting change, but it was much easier than the tear-drop one. A bit hard on my hand-drill (it no like slow and hard), but it was a little cold out, so she warmed up my hands

    Since I can grind it on my bench-grinder (honestly, didn't thunk it possible), that begs the question...why not grind a proper geometry into it? I suppose, nothin' to it, but to do it
    "Things that are complex are not useful, things that are useful are simple."
    - Mikhail Kalashnikov

  10. #300
    Senior Member r4z0r7o3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Raleigh, North Carolina
    Posts
    1,316

    Wink

    Update: New power supply location + start of an enclosure

    Woke up one morning with a vision: Crucible exploded in furnace...hot aluminum leaking down drain, dripping through holes in my cart...and...right...onto...the power supply.

    Decided to build a small enclosure on the tail, mounting the power supply to the inside/back wall, something like this. Enclosure will be framed up in angle-iron then covered in sheet-metal.


    The whole thing will be hinged, so I can swing it open for access. Hinged top welded up here (not on an angle). Clamped up for plug-welding (stainless hinge onto steel tube, meh, it'll be painted).


    This funny vice-grip thing (clamping about-to-be-welded hole) is for sheet-metal (I think). Got it at horrible-fright for a few bucks.


    All the holes are tacked, now to fill 'em in.


    Second pass. I'm wire-brushing the oxidation off while it's still hot...just like Mr. Pete taught me. Or was it weld.com? I don't remember which.


    Pried it open, my spacing-tape burned a little but not too bad. Probably should have used metal shims, oh well.


    Bit-o-scrubbing with WD-40 and the goo comes right off.


    Action is nice and free.


    I don't have a shot of the final welds. About 50% of them came out okay, I blew a few of the holes out by melting the edge of the hinge-sheet, but it's not too bad. Nothing a grinder and some paint can't cover and make me weldn' look great!

    Next up is to tack the hinged piece to my frame and finish cutting, coping, and fitting up the enclosure edges. Then welding, then skinning, then mounting the power-supply and moving on with wiring.
    "Things that are complex are not useful, things that are useful are simple."
    - Mikhail Kalashnikov

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •