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Thread: r4z0r7o3's Crucible-furnace lifting mechanism / transport-stand.

  1. #271
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    Quote Originally Posted by r4z0r7o3 View Post
    Mind you I had to do this all with scratch-start because there's absolutely no way to use a foot-pedal while sitting on the floor.
    Sounds like a quitter's attitude...

    Maybe somebody knows some on-the-ground pedal technique, but I couldn't figure any out. I'm aware they sell torch-mount controls for these situations, but they're pricey, $150 - $200
    When I bought my tig used it came with a thumb switch taped to one of the torches. I personally can't stand it, so I took it off. Now that I've read of your troubles I'm glad I didn't unloaded it. If I had to come up with a "method" to use the peddle while on the ground, I'd probably rest my forearm on it, and lean on it to adjust the juice. Of course every situation is going to be different and that may not have even worked for you.
    FLAME ON...!!!!

  2. #272
    Senior Member r4z0r7o3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by J. Vibert View Post
    I personally can't stand it, so I took it off. Now that I've read of your troubles I'm glad I didn't unloaded it. If I had to come up with a "method" to use the peddle while on the ground, I'd probably rest my forearm on it, and lean on it to adjust the juice. Of course every situation is going to be different and that may not have even worked for you.
    "Lean on it", good idea, thanks, I'll file that away in the bag-o-tricks. Yeah, everyone I've spoken to hates them. Crazy thing is, the one with just an on/off switch was more expensive than the fancy one with the thumb wheel. In any case, scratch-start and fixed-amps seems it may be a useful skill as well. Someone said it's like striking a match...it's nothing like that, waaaaay less pressure. If you "strike" it hard, you weld your tip.

    I've been thinking though, this may be an accessory within reach of DIY. I've got the electrical specs and drawing for my blue-tig-box, all I need to do is some digging to find the 14-pin screw-on connector. I'm sure Newark or DigiKey's got 'em, just need to do the clickie-clickie work. The other parts (switch/button and a pot) are jelly-beans, maybe $3 tops. Those nice rubber cables and all the certs is where the money is (my guess).
    "Things that are complex are not useful, things that are useful are simple."
    - Mikhail Kalashnikov

  3. #273
    My little tig doesn't do foot pedals ...just scratch start . neat Trick I learned was hold the tungsten just above the metal (about where it should be to weld) then bump the tip and the base metal with back end of your filler rod (not the end your going to use in the puddle) arc starts right up and you don't contaminate your weld with tungsten (I'm not a good enough tig welder for that part to matter...but I've been told that's a big deal ).
    CBB

  4. #274
    Quote Originally Posted by caster View Post
    "Things that are complex are not useful, things that are useful are simple."
    - Mikhail Kalashnikov
    While that is true, remember:




    I'm pretty sure we've all that one (at least!) project that got away from us. I know I surely have!
    "Success is 99% determination"

  5. #275
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    Quote Originally Posted by r4z0r7o3 View Post
    I've been thinking though, this may be an accessory within reach of DIY.
    Oh totally... It's just a pot and connector as you said.

    Now, if you can come up with a bargin basement build for a liquid cooled torch, and accompanying cooler, I'd be all ears.
    FLAME ON...!!!!

  6. #276
    Senior Member r4z0r7o3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by _Jason View Post
    Overkill...is underrated
    Lolz, it is true. If you're clueless as to how strong something needs to be...overengineer the f*)k out of it!

    Had an idea this morning: What about a larynx/vibration torch control. The louder you yell, the more angry-pixies jump into the argon-plasma.

    Now, if you can come up with a bargin basement build for a liquid cooled torch
    IIRC, this is a frequent topic on the welding web. If you don't mind fugly, could always wrap a bunch of copper tubing around your torch-head, water-cool that, and bob's your auntie
    "Things that are complex are not useful, things that are useful are simple."
    - Mikhail Kalashnikov

  7. #277
    Senior Member r4z0r7o3's Avatar
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    Updated the electrical schematic (in place / post above). Removed Thermal Fuse from -63v side up to +63v side (somewhat-pointless on the - side, since that's grounded to chassis).

    I also spent (quite a while) making a hook-up plan to my four terminal blocks. Doing it this way is going to consume a bit more wire, however it will make troubleshooting and testing immensely easier (i.e. having most connections in one place). The down-side is I'm going to have a spaghetti-mess of wires to shove into my electrical box. I'll probably get out my label-printer and number both ends so I can keep some sanity.

    Code:
    A IN                         A OUT
    ==============               ==============
    1 63v+ PSU (out 1)           1 Inline Fuse -> E/D SW2+ (inp)
    2 12v+ PSU (out 1)           2 N/C
    3 Chassis Ground (lug)       3 Chassis Ground (Y out)
    4 12v- PSU (out 1)           4 N/C
    5 63v- PSU (out 1)           5 E/D SW2- (inp)
    
    
    B IN                         B OUT
    ==============               ==============
    1 U/limit SW4- (out)         1 Motor - (Y inp)
    2 D/limit SW5- (out)         2 Motor + (Y inp)
    3 E/D SW2+ (out)             3 Snub D1+ (inp)
    4 E/D SW2- (Y out)           4 Snub D2+ (inp)
    5 E/D SW2- (Y out)           5 U/O/D SW3- (inp)
    
    
    C IN                         C OUT
    ==============               ==============
    1 Snub D1- (out)             1 U/O/D SW3+ (Y inp)
    2 U/limit SW4+ (out)         2 Motor + (Y inp)
    3 Chassis Ground (Y inp)     3 Motor GND
    4 D/limit SW5+ (out)         4 Motor - (Y inp)
    5 Snub D2- (out)             5 U/O/D SW3+ (Y inp)
    
    
    D IN                         D OUT
    ==============               ==============
    1 U/O/D SW3 UP+ (out)        1 U/limit SW4+ (inp)
    2 U/O/D SW3 DN- (out)        2 D/limit SW5- (inp)
    3 Chassis Ground (Y inp)     3 63v- PSU (out 2) & 12v- PSU (out 2)
    4 U/O/D SW3 UP- (out)        4 U/limit SW4- (inp)
    5 U/O/D SW3 DN+ (out)        5 D/limit SW5+ (inp)

    Notes:
    • Don't try to read the hookup table on it's own (it'll make you cross-eyed). It's meant to be understood along side the electrical schematic. This is analogous to a cutting-list (which you'd never try to use w/o the plans/drawings nearby).
    • "(out)" is the output from a switch/device, "(inp)" is the input to a switch/device.
    • "E/D": Enable/Disable switch; "U/Limit": Upward-limit switch; "U/O/D": up, off, down switch.
    • The "+" and "-" labels on the snubber-diodes (D1 and D2) denote their anode and cathode sides (not the rail voltage).
    • Each of the four terminal blocks is labeled with a letter (A, B, C, and D).
    • Each line item on the left-side (e.g. A IN) is electrically connected to the right-side (e.g. A OUT).
    • There are two "Y" connections, they're labeled so I understand them, sorry if it's confusing for you.
    • The terminal blocks are arranged in a "+" shape- A and D are next to each-other, as are B and C.
    • Where possible, I tried to keep contentious points physically separated on the same side of each block (to help avoid accidentally shorting bad things together). e.g. 63v+ and 63v- are on opposite ends of block "A"
    • This looks more complicated than it is, the extra verbosity is helpful for troubleshooting & spotting errors (if you see something, say something )
    "Things that are complex are not useful, things that are useful are simple."
    - Mikhail Kalashnikov

  8. #278
    If you're going to run all the wires into one box for ease of troubleshooting.... Use all the same color wires and forget to label them.... That will put the spice back into trouble shooting

  9. #279
    Senior Member caster's Avatar
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    If you're going to run all the wires into one box for ease of troubleshooting.... Use all the same color wires and forget to label them.... That will put the spice back into trouble shooting
    If you consistently get it right the first time there is no need for QA.....

    Caster

    (Now who gets it right the first time?, as much as I try I don't often get it right the first time.)
    Last edited by caster; 02-24-2017 at 11:55 AM.

  10. #280
    Senior Member r4z0r7o3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CrazyBillyBob View Post
    If you're going to run all the wires into one box for ease of troubleshooting.... Use all the same color wires and forget to label them.... That will put the spice back into trouble shooting
    ...and be sure to yank them through full-burr holes and zip-tie them really tightly together to guarantee maximum chance for shorts. Hehehehehe.

    Today I fixed up the motor-mount holes I drilled in the wrong place (by making them much larger), and recovered from almost drilling it's adjusting bolt holes in the wrong place (bit of sand-paper + fresh-coat of dykem).

    Then there was a lot of holding-up of angle-iron scraps in various places, plus some head-scratching. Trying to figure how/where/what I'm going to mount the power-supply and control-box to.

    Thinking of making a small enclosure (box) on the back-side of the cart. Angle-iron frame w/ sheet-metal sides, maybe the control-box up on a post so I don't gotta bend-over so much.

    Not sure yet though. Heavily considering putting the control-box at the front of the cart (business-end) instead. Downside is, that requires a lot more wire, and this silicone-stuff ain't that cheap. I probably should jerry-rig it up quick-n-dirty first, you know, to make sure the contraption-part can properly contrapulates up and down, w/o using up my whole jug of blinker-fluid or wear out the muffler bearings

    Tomorrow or Sunday I'm planning to head back over to Thom's to help clean up all the oil dripping off of his Van Norman...while he expertly cuts the keyway in the lead-screw. It's only a 1-inch long keyway, but I'm sure it'll take at least 2 hours to setup (including replacing all the oil that's leaked out)
    "Things that are complex are not useful, things that are useful are simple."
    - Mikhail Kalashnikov

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