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Thread: r4z0r7o3's Crucible-furnace lifting mechanism / transport-stand.

  1. #301
    Senior Member r4z0r7o3's Avatar
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    Drilled holes into the inside-face of the hinged assembly, big enough to get the screw-head in, the opposite face has a thread-size hole. Stuck a sharpie through the holes to mark the small hole onto the frame-assembly. I tried using a transfer-pinch but it couldn't get a positive fit into either the near or far hole. So I just eyeballed it and hand-punched about in the center of each sharpie-circles.


    Screws fit nicely, and give me access to tighten them down.


    Now for the not-so-fun part, again, trying to drill Chinese-bead-frame a.k.a. adamantium. Regular drill-bit made a small dimple before it started squealing badly. Switched to a brazed-carbide masonary bit that I ground with a vintage craftsman drill-sharpening jig.


    Lots and lots of pressure (all my weight basically) and trying to keep the drill just barely faster than the bit-stall speed. Made it through five-of-six holes. The left-most dimple simply refused to be converted into a hole. Re-sharpened my bits twice, still no love. Must be hardened-adamantium.


    Made a half-arse attempt to temper the adamantium back a bit using an oxy-propane torch. Heated the whole thing up until it got dark-blue.


    Then I played the flame around on it for about 5 minutes so it would cool off a slowly as possible.


    Still no love! Masonry bit just got super hot, and I started to worry about loosing the braze and/or temper of it's shaft. In a last-ditch effort, switched to the tear-drop masonry bit + hammer-mode and what-ya know? It blasted right through!


    The bit didn't fare well, giant chip of carbide fell off the back of the right-side flute. No matter, though, it's a cheap bit and I have the final hole.


    Now, I used the movable-jaw of a bar-clamp to steady a length of angle-iron (store-bought, non-Chinesium, lesson-learned). The band saw slices and dices...in the grand-tradition of cut three-times, sorta-kinda-measure, and prey it will all work out in the end.


    Used cutoff-wheel in my grinder to cope the ends of the angle-iron. Then some TIG tack-welding happened.


    Damn, should have preyed harder, it doesn't fit at all. Though you can kinda see what I'm goin' for here. Okay, onto the final step...


    ...Draw up some plans for the second-try, get a new piece of angle marked and build the same thing again, only with correct dimentions this time
    "Things that are complex are not useful, things that are useful are simple."
    - Mikhail Kalashnikov

  2. #302
    Senior Member r4z0r7o3's Avatar
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    Though you may not be able to tell from the earlier pic - it was a horrible quad-skew-octo-deco-trapazoidogon. Not a box at all. Now it's a much nicer fit, though nothing's perfectly square, the the lengths right and paired, and it certainly passes my eye-ball squareness test.


    This stuff is so close to the floor, the TIG foot pedal is inconvenient to use. Rather than mess with scratch-start, I switched to stick-mode. That's a 6013 5/32" electrode and I'm running around 50amps


    There's about about 1/8" - 3/32" gap at the bottom corners. The bottom-plate of the cart isn't straight either, but the way I look at it is, it's just extra ventilation for the electronics and gearbox


    Getting the cross-pieces tacked took quite a bit of work. They were cut as if the box was square, so some heating and beating was required. I was surprised that while you need a special nozzle for oxy-propane cutting, a regular oxy-acetylene welding tip works just fine for heating. Now I can truly say, I've used every one of the popular welding-processes in building this cart


    Removed all the clamps and...


    her skirt lifts up real nice and easy


    The Power-supply is getting mounted inside the box, to the inside of the door. Though I'm going to skin this (on the inside of the iron). I still need some more support for the weight of the giant copper coil. Oh snap!


    I totally just welded my damn clamp right onto the thing, lol, okay, something to watch out for when stick-tacking, it's not so spot-on accurate like other processes


    Here's roughly how the power-supply will be mounted, and enhance the door's gravity so it stays closed all by itself.


    Finally, I cut up some paper shopping bags and made templates for all the pieces of sheet-metal I need to cut. There are a few pieces that will need edges bent. I simply folded those bends into the paper before cutting the other edges (in-place)


    Next, all the paper and tape comes off, and I use the templates for cutting out the sheet metal.
    "Things that are complex are not useful, things that are useful are simple."
    - Mikhail Kalashnikov

  3. #303
    Looks like it's coming along nicely. Are you worried about the life of that piano hinge? With the potential for a number of things to fall in/on it and it being a thinner, flimsier hinge, I would worry about it getting destroyed. I've seen them get ruined time and time again. You start to open it; didn't see a piece of slag that bounced over onto it; get's caught in the hinge; ruined hinge that works like garbage now. I prefer using beefier hinges with fewer points of rotation. I could just be worried about the benign, but it is on a horizontal surface right next to the furnace.

    The hinges I prefer:
    005_1024x1024.jpeg
    Or at least something similar. I would rather use two of these than one long piano hinge.

    On another note... Hurry up and finish this thing so we can see it working, moving, lifting, melting!

  4. #304
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    You may want to consider how much crud and debris you'll be catching within the frame if you skin the inside rather than the outside.

    Your skin templates concern me... How far off from square are you that you need templates...?

    ...and good call on weighting the door with the power supply. The 10lbs of angle iron would certainly float away otherwise...lol

    I'm​ sure I've just lost track but what did you use the spool gun for...?
    FLAME ON...!!!!

  5. #305
    Senior Member r4z0r7o3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wes Henderson View Post
    get's caught in the hinge; ruined hinge that works like garbage now.
    Being stainless-steel, it's a bit less flimsy than the zinc or brass kind. Also, it doesn't open all the way, only 90* or so. Finally, the tube it's welded to is thin wall, maybe 18ga, so heavy welding was out of the question. Still, point taken.

    Note to self: sweep off the hinge before opening

    Quote Originally Posted by J. Vibert View Post
    You may want to consider how much crud and debris you'll be catching within the frame if you skin the inside rather than the outside.
    Hmmm, that's something to consider.

    Quote Originally Posted by J. Vibert View Post
    Your skin templates concern me... How far off from square are you that you need templates...?
    Perhaps 1/4-in over 18-in length, give-or-take. I probably didn't strictly need the templates, but they're faster than measuring and getting something wrong

    Quote Originally Posted by J. Vibert View Post
    The 10lbs of angle iron would certainly float away otherwise...lol
    Hehehe, like an iron-kite ya, lol. Mmmm, think of it like a child-safety device, keep young hands out of dangerous areas...next to a 3000* furnace

    In reality, there's just no better place to put it that doesn't interfere with the motor or support structures. Inside the top is too narrow (due to square-tubing on one side), the walls are blocked by bracing, and there's not enough room on the floor.

    Quote Originally Posted by J. Vibert View Post
    I'm​ sure I've just lost track but what did you use the spool gun for...?
    That thing's loaded up with flux-core. I used it for tacking some parts of the rail-frame, but most recently tacking on the limit-switch brackets. Mostly because I haddn't yet gotten up the nerve to try out "stick" - out of fear of blowing holes in things. Which, interestingly lead me to try out stick...for fixing holes in things.

    Seriously though, I found it's a good first lesson when teaching yourself: How to fix the mistakes you'll inevitably make after step three.

    Lesson two: Where's the power button and fire-extinguisher.
    "Things that are complex are not useful, things that are useful are simple."
    - Mikhail Kalashnikov

  6. #306
    I'm still waiting to see you laser weld something onto the lifter thingy

    I'm enjoying the use every tool that makes it easier aspect of the project ! Whatever it takes to get it finished! Keep up the good work.

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