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Thread: r4z0r7o3's Crucible-furnace lifting mechanism / transport-stand.

  1. #311
    Senior Member r4z0r7o3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by J. Vibert View Post
    Not to pat myself on the back but that's a good call.
    Lol, well, not to toot your horn for you, it was a good idea. I had a vision of exactly the stitch-weld, crud-in-gap scenario you described...you must not have been wearing your tin-foil hat yesterday.

    Quote Originally Posted by J. Vibert View Post
    The frame is hinged to access the inside...
    Actually, I was planning on putting the handle on the inside, so I don't trip over it. Then for access, I'd remove one of the skins to grab the handle, then I can lift open the door easily

    (Sorry, don't mean to poke fun, just the image of that reminds me of looney-tunes)

    Seriously though, I've actually been mulling over screwing the skins on instead of welding them. However, I'm also searching for reasons why I might ever want to change/remove/swap them. So far, only reasons I can come up with are cosmetic. Anything y'all can think of? Probably best just weld 'em on.
    "Things that are complex are not useful, things that are useful are simple."
    - Mikhail Kalashnikov

  2. #312
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    Are these skins going to be BOLTED onto more Chineseium, like your adamantium frame? You can't drill that stuff and now you want to tap it too? Good luck with that, just weld'em on and be done with it.

    My $0.02 worth,
    Don
    Too many irons, not enough fire,

  3. #313
    Senior Member r4z0r7o3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ddmckee54 View Post
    Are these skins going to be BOLTED onto more Chineseium, like your adamantium frame? You can't drill that stuff and now you want to tap it too? Good luck with that, just weld'em on and be done with it.
    You're right, and good point. A few of the pieces are Chinese Adamantium, I didn't replace all of them, thanks for noticing.

    I'm thinking of using a 1/2" x 3/16" x 1" long pieces of bar-stock as brackets to grab the inside, and bolt to the skin. i.e., drilling/tapping the bracket. In any case, the only reason I can come up with, is for attaching the power-supply to the mounting rails. That will be much easier if that particular skin is not welded on. Still thinking about it though.
    "Things that are complex are not useful, things that are useful are simple."
    - Mikhail Kalashnikov

  4. #314
    Senior Member r4z0r7o3's Avatar
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    I got all the skins cut out and ready for welding today. First, a template was attached and pulled flat with magnets. Then I went around the edges with a valve-action paint marker.


    That left a line to follow with a jig-saw. Then I took the skin to the belt-sander (sorry, no pic) and brought the edge up to the line. Last step was rounding all the sharp corners and de-burring. Lather...rinse...and repeat four more times.


    Back onto the inside of the door, I laid the power supply down onto the mounting plates and used a transfer-punch to mark the holes.


    Those got drilled out.


    Then tapped for 1/4-20 threads.


    Then I cut 1-in studs of 1/4-20 threaded rod, and ground a severe chamfer onto one end. The holes also got pretty big chamfers cut into them, on the outside of the door.


    The studs were threaded in until the chamfer end was flush, and I did two passes with the TIG, penetrating as deeply as possible so they're well and truly anchored.


    The I ground off the weld beads (they'd make the door skin bump-out). This is also why I went for such extreme penetration.


    The power supply holes ended up being metric (my guess) because the fit to the studs was super tight, despite the alignment being pretty good. I drilled 'em out to 5/16, and she slid right on. She rests perfectly flat against the mounting plates since the welding was done on the outside.


    Next I need to finish welding up the frame, and then I've got some new weld-thru primer I want to try out on the inside of the skins. Having had tons of problems with a different brand (Copperweld) before, I've got some new stuff to try. It's self-etching and chock-full of zinc, with very little (<10%) crap that will off-gas during welding. Anyway, I'll do some tests first with some new stuff just to be sure.

    For those that missed my prior lessons: Weld-thru primer is like spray-paint that can withstand (for a very short time) the heat of welding near or through it. You put it on the inside of thin metal panels, where you'll have no access to paint after they're welded. It's purpose is to prevent hidden-rust forming between the two surfaces where moisture can become trapped.
    "Things that are complex are not useful, things that are useful are simple."
    - Mikhail Kalashnikov

  5. #315
    Senior Member r4z0r7o3's Avatar
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    Finished welding up the frame, inside, and outside just to be sure. I'll grind down the outside welds so the skins will lie flush.


    I also did a test of this new weld-through-primer I got. I'll start up a new thread for that, with pics. The get-to-the-point conclusion is: "Holy shit that stuff works good. But don't breathe the fumes, or put it on too thick."
    Last edited by r4z0r7o3; 04-02-2017 at 11:16 PM.
    "Things that are complex are not useful, things that are useful are simple."
    - Mikhail Kalashnikov

  6. #316
    Senior Member r4z0r7o3's Avatar
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    Update:
    • Taxes: Check
    • Enclosure-welding: Check
    • Recovery from massive Home-IT infrastructure failure: Ongoing*
    • Primer-ing: Bzzzzzzz


    Was taking things apart to get ready for some painting, then I remembered, the fab-rah-cobbling ain't done yet. So, I'm going to mount up the PSU as-is (no skins), re-assemble what I took apart (not much), and get back onto the wiring & testing

    Once the major lifting part is proven-out, I'll finish welding up the arms and lifting carriage. I also need to add the lid-support & pivot. One thing I'm kind of struggling with is how to make a "flat" platform of IFBs for my furnace to rest on. The top platform of the cart is NOT flat, it's got a bow down the middle due to excessive-heat from oxy-welding it together (oops). I'd guesstimate it's maybe off +/- 1/2in across the width and span.

    My latest thinking is to get some of that floor-leveling compound, build some damns, and let it do it's job. Then stack the bricks on top. Otherwise it seems it would be a painstaking job of scraping brick, test-fit, and lots and lots of "repeat".

    Any brighter or easier ideas?



    *Disaster story: I was re-partitioning my only remaining DNS/Kerberos server, (prior to migrating to a pair of raspberry-pi's) and forgot to re-mark the boot partition before rebooting. A single-command omission...DoH! Stupid me, running it under M$ Hyper-V, figured they'd have some snazzy/clickie tool to fix that. Nope. Had to convert the damn image into a Linux-friendly format, copy it to a Linux box, fix the partition table, copy and convert it back, and prey M$ WindBlows was in a good mood. Eventually got 'er fixed, but sheesh! No more critical VMs under Hyper-V, what a flipping' nightmare! The's Pi's are sooo cute and draw less than a few amps each...a far (and hysterical) cry from my 550watt WindBlows box. Nearly done migrating now, just a few bits and bobs left to do.
    "Things that are complex are not useful, things that are useful are simple."
    - Mikhail Kalashnikov

  7. #317
    If your using full sized IFB. Just weld in (not with a Rosebud on a fire hose blue wrench this time ) some properly sized (or close enough) shims. make sure there's 2 or so under each IFB or weld the shims down and weld a IFB (or two) sized plate of sheet metal to the shims...Like wooden blocks under plywood to level it out. For the thinner shims use some weld. The floor leveling stuff is mostly acrylic with stone powder added. It doesn't play nice with heat and the fumes are not the best for you (but which fume coming off a foundry furnace are ?).

    Just an Option.

  8. #318
    Senior Member r4z0r7o3's Avatar
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    Yes these are full-size IFBs. Interesting idea. Though it seems like carving a course of IFBs would be slightly easier, your way sounds more precise.

    okay, no go on the leveling compound...but maybe I could make my own (furnace-mortar and sand?). Then "level" it with a screed running along the tops of the angle-iron sides. Place my IFBs on top, then weigh them down evenly with a plate, while cleaning up the squeeze-out. That would also keep the IFBs firmly attached...so they don't get stolen by some punk-kids.

    Hmmm, thinking more...why not tack-weld a giant furnace-size plate right across, between the angle-iron sides, shimmed up to "level" as you suggested. Basically same as your idea, just all-at-once instead of one IFB at a time.

    Thanks for the suggestion.
    "Things that are complex are not useful, things that are useful are simple."
    - Mikhail Kalashnikov

  9. #319
    Senior Member Tobho Mott's Avatar
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    LOL, better be careful there, those IFB's are just what the punk kids are after these days - bricks that break into pieces and bounce off when you try to throw them through a window...

    Jeff
    Tobho had learned to work Valyrian steel at the forges of Qohor as a boy. Only a man who knew the spells could take old weapons and forge them anew.

    How I built my oil furnace | My Photo Album | My Videos

  10. #320
    One big plate works... You don't want this thing blowing away in a light F5 breeze

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