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Thread: r4z0r7o3's Crucible-furnace lifting mechanism / transport-stand.

  1. #1
    Senior Member r4z0r7o3's Avatar
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    Talking r4z0r7o3's Crucible-furnace lifting mechanism / transport-stand.

    Hey guys,

    I was really unsure of where to start this thread, since it's kind of an add-on to my furnace-build, but it's also a machine at the same time .

    After having read, re-read, thoroughly studied Gingery's design and considering caster's feedback of 'rail-binding', I'm thinking of modifying Gingery's design by substituting square-tube vertical rails for his two 45*-rotated angle-iron rails. To help further, I'd use four sliding-door rollers (with bearings) on each side of the carriage, connected to arms supporting/lifting the furnace body. This whole moving/lifting mechanism would all be one unit. I'm thinking of using a scissor-lift type mechanism to help affect the raising/lowering. Here's a super-duper rough drawing:



    The diagonal-lines represent the lifting levers, they need not be top/bottom symmetrical, only left/right - i.e. I may make the bottom ones shorter/longer depending on leverage. As for actually moving the levers (and the 100+ lb of furnace body, lid, and carriage), I've researched two options (I'd love some opinions and/or other suggestions):

    1. Pneumatic/Hydrolic Jack
    2. Linear Actuator


    As I see it, Option-1 has both a cost advantage and a "manual override" in case air-pressure dies. The biggest disadvantage is likely lifting speed. Option-2 address the lifting speed (0.3-in/sec) issue, and mechanical simplicity (less to go wrong) but costs three-times as much and has no built-in manual override (though the quality is quite high - heavily ISO-certified product. Either would likely attach to the frame-bottom, and the center pivot (middle "X") of the scizzor levers.

    What'd'y'all think?
    "Things that are complex are not useful, things that are useful are simple."
    - Mikhail Kalashnikov

  2. #2
    I like those ideas but they are too pre-made for this build. Build your own!
    http://www.instructables.com/id/Maki...ator/?ALLSTEPS
    Maybe 1" acme threaded rod.... A cordless drill might power it.

  3. #3
    Senior Member moya034's Avatar
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    I vote for a Chinese Windlass made with steel cable.


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    Definitely not complicated enough. Go for the diy Jack screw. ...and a done from scratch power supply for some icing on the cake.

  5. #5
    Senior Member moya034's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by J. Vibert View Post
    Definitely not complicated enough.
    Add a belt (or chain) driven stepper motor to drive the windlass. Use either a garden variety stepper IC or go the micro-controller and Arduino it run the stepper

  6. #6
    Arduino is a great idea, hooked to a thermocouple to sense the temperature, when its time to pour the lift will atcuate, signal the fog machine and blue light, then a speaker will announce, 'You're melt is ready to pour, sir."

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    One of our members has a very wise signature:

    "Things that are complex are not useful, things that are useful are simple."
    r4z0r7o3
    When I die, Heaven can wait—I want to go to McMaster-Carr.

  8. #8
    Senior Member moya034's Avatar
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    I agree, simple is good when it comes to molten metal which is why I suggested the Chinese Windless. A frame, set of ways (sliding pipe/tubing), some cable, and a rotating thingy will get the job done. The Chinese Windlass also has the distinct advantage that as soon as you stop cranking, it's going to hold the load exactly where you left it... built in brake! I don't think you can get simpler.

    Quote Originally Posted by FrostOakFoundry View Post
    Arduino is a great idea, hooked to a thermocouple to sense the temperature, when its time to pour the lift will atcuate, signal the fog machine and blue light, then a speaker will announce, 'You're melt is ready to pour, sir."
    This had me ROFLA for a few minutes! Thanks for that!

  9. #9
    Senior Member r4z0r7o3's Avatar
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    Lolz. Funny thing is I have all thats needed to pull that off, but, yeah, sounds dangerous - what if a glitch made it start speaking in chineese?

    Actually I was originally thinking of a block/pulley arrangement. I like the windlass idea, simple to make, and could support powered/manual operation. My main concern with that is the extra height required - which brought me to push, instead of pull. But now that I consider it, maybe it wouldant need to be all that tall, and extra height would be an advantage for wheeling the thing around (for storage).

    I'd put a windlass on its side, and use that with my idea above, but somehow cables and scissors don't strike me as mixing well.

    Thanks for the ideas guys, i'll do another iteration...
    "Things that are complex are not useful, things that are useful are simple."
    - Mikhail Kalashnikov

  10. #10
    Senior Member r4z0r7o3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rasper View Post
    One of our members has a very wise signature:

    r4z0r7o3
    Yes, thanks for the reminder, thats exactly why I put that there. Though, simple is as simple(tons) does - a windlass would seem complicated to some. For me, I take his advice to mean 'moving' part count or number of things that could go wrong...hmm that gives me an idea...
    "Things that are complex are not useful, things that are useful are simple."
    - Mikhail Kalashnikov

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