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Thread: Smaller Gingery-esq. foundry for beginner

  1. #321

    Further encouragement(?)

    No, not a furnace/'barbie'/'cooker' - but a needed tool to secure the materials for same:
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    Ouch! That stuff's hot!

  2. #322
    Senior Member r4z0r7o3's Avatar
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    Nice! I bet it could carry an elephant Looks really well build.


    ...on the topic of this furnace thingie...

    ...oofff...tooooo many paint fumes...

    (collecting pics)
    "Things that are complex are not useful, things that are useful are simple."
    - Mikhail Kalashnikov

  3. #323
    No, not an elephant - won't fit. Most of a month's groceries/2 50 lb bags of petrobond sand - no trouble, providing one avoids hills. Hills are a workout and three-quarters when one has a *load*. No hills, no trouble - rolls easy, steers good, can tow it for 'some miles'. (Which I've done earlier this month)

    Now, once the connecting rod has its spring-tabs properly brazed on... (no, put down the cleaver) and is painted, and the remaining three fabric panels attached with their velcro-and-webbing straps, then it's time for a ***welding cart*** - need tools to make tools, oh, and a foundry to make parts.

    My ***own*** foundry. Yes, I have access to two people's ready-existing foundries, and I can and do patterns ***now***.

    But I want to do ***petrobond*** (sob). I want castings that are smooth enough that I can rub them...

    Dennis
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    Last edited by den; 11-16-2017 at 04:56 PM. Reason: Spelling, picture
    Ouch! That stuff's hot!

  4. #324
    Senior Member r4z0r7o3's Avatar
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    Paint's dryin', so time for posting photos I been collecting over the last month...

    Here's one of the two lid-support rods bent and fit up for tacking. Getting the angles right took FOREVER of guess-and-check.


    Used a adjustable miter-gauge to match angles when bending up the second one.


    Up top is just a fender-washer, so I can add/remove smaller washers to adjust the tension.


    Another fender on the bottom, holding up my ugly-ass weld. You can see how close the bend is and the oddball angles involved.





    Building the leveling-base required precisely aligned bolt holes and bolt-head keepers. So I clamped the thing down and drilled through both the base and platform with a really small bit.


    Enlarged the bottom plate holes with a tap-size bit, then tapped 'em all for carriage bolts.


    Plan is to weld some handles on bolts from the under side, where the jamb nuts will be as well. That's got to wait for the painting to be finished though.


    The rounded head of the carriage bolts will better support the furnace weight while minimizing any chance of bending should the furnace impart any side-loading (e.g. while being rolled around).


    Primed and painted the platform. Then on the under-side, welded three little 'fingers' around doubled-up washers, at each carriage-bolt location. This was a bit of a pain, but allows the base to "float" slightly, and absorb any misalignment caused by the warped platform plate or any crooked bolt-holes.




    Here you can see how the doubled up washers capture the carriage-bolt heads, yet can float about 1/4-in. in any direction. In hind-sight, probably overkill, but I felt obligated to fight back in this "made-in-china" world we live in.





    Hung the lid-support pivot-tube from it's upper bolt-hole, then got a layer of primer on it.


    Cleaned, primed, and painted the control-panel, along with the lid-supports and cabinet hold-open mechanism parts. A thin coat of weld-through primer was applied to one side of the cabinet skins...


    ...as well as the cabinet frame.


    Took my time welding the skins to the frame. This was really rough-going, since the skins are only 22-ga. mild-steel, but the frame is 1/8" Chinese bed-frame angle iron (hard as granite).


    Called it done with the skins connected at all the key points. Trying to weld it up any further would cause too much distortion in the frame and probably buckle the skins.


    Cabinet exterior, got thoroughly sanded, de-greased, and primed....


    ...then painted. I just left the weld-through primer on the inside, since it's high-zinc and doesn't hold paint well. The interior won't see any/much wear. Better have the corrosion protection than paint nobody will ever see.


    Cleaned, primed, and painted the electrical box.


    Same for the top-rail, one of it's end cover-plates, and both limit-switch brackets.


    All the width-adjustment shims got a light primer and paint coat. Not strictly necessary, but will keep any moisture trapped between them from causing trouble.


    The carriage-rails, upper-frame brackets, and remaining width-adjustment shims all got cleaned, primed, and painted.


    Spent about two hours sanding and wire-brushing the lifting arms and carriage. Fixed the missing end-cap on the right-side arm by welding a 1/16" piece of scrap over it. Finally, I came back with a small wire-wheel in my die-grinder, to clean out all the places my grinder couldn't reach. Sooooo many nooks-crannies on the thing (and it was super dirty).


    Spent another half-hour cleaning all the grease and grime off the thing, before it also got primed and painted.


    The remaining two and a half cans of paint, and three of primer, will be used on the rolling platform. Though some minor welding needs to be done first. A removable heat-shield / access-panel needs to be fabricated. I discovered if I were to welded it on, it would block access to some critical frame bolts/nuts needed for assembly. Once the platform is done and painted, the only thing left is to spray rigidizer on the mineral-fiber insulation, and paint the furnace skins.

    I got some high-temp (1200*) primer and paint from KBS Coatings. They happened to have a color which almost exactly matches the industrial-blue I'm using on the framework. The price wasn't too outrageous, and their application instructions / guidance was much more through, and informative, than the common-brands. It's also USA-made...which hopefully has come across as a common theme for this build
    Last edited by r4z0r7o3; 11-27-2017 at 02:18 PM.
    "Things that are complex are not useful, things that are useful are simple."
    - Mikhail Kalashnikov

  5. #325
    Senior Member r4z0r7o3's Avatar
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    Un-building complete! I also took the time to grind down all the sharp corners and chamfer all the holes. Now with the platform naked, I can start prepping it for painting.

    I'm convinced somewhere in this house is a pile of mismatched lost socks munching on another pile of mismatched lost nuts and washers. You can see here I've bagged up all the screws, nuts, bolts and other hardware for safekeeping. Sock-n-nut monster be damned!


    The rest of the electrical nubbins are piled up, along with another gallon-size zip-lock full of all the switches and internal wiring bits (off camera).


    Just the platform and the furnace skins left to paint, then four more months to re-assemble the thing, just in time for warmer weather
    "Things that are complex are not useful, things that are useful are simple."
    - Mikhail Kalashnikov

  6. #326
    Has the cape given you a launch date yet? Looks great.

  7. #327
    Senior Member r4z0r7o3's Avatar
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    Lol, thanks. Well, realistically it's probably going to be early spring, weather depending for lift-off. I'm learning (the hard way) why all paints say "best applied between 60-80*F". The trick seems to be- extra-super-light coats, nozzle 1.5x further away, and give it extra flash-time. Takes a lot longer, but seems to be the only way to avoid runs and solvent-bubbles. Same for greensand, stuff tends to get a bit stiff when it's freezing out (been getting into the 20*s at night here).

    I'm also re-re-remembering, I've got the whole burner assembly needs some additional attention. It wasn't designed to reach the current height of my furnace. I also found that while the blower worked fine externally, it doesn't provide enough flow against the back-pressure of furnace-combustion. I have another motor, and all materials to raise the burner height, just need to get'er'done.

    This will likely by my winter project, and I took most of Dec. off of work, so I'll have some solid blocks of hours to put in.
    "Things that are complex are not useful, things that are useful are simple."
    - Mikhail Kalashnikov

  8. #328
    Senior Member r4z0r7o3's Avatar
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    Backyard superfun-D site score: Thirteen squirrels, four chipmunks, nine birds, and 143,258 earthworms.

    Ya see, after about the 9th sanding-disc on my grinder, I decided: This is the hardest way to remove mil-scale from my contraption's main platform. Scratches the hell out of the steel and gets that damn black dust everywhere.

    15-minutes later, after some youtube "research", I was at Lowe's buying a Tyvek suit, respirator cartridges, 3M scouring pads, and a gallon of Hydrochloric acid. About two hours later, the last piece is ready for painting
    "Things that are complex are not useful, things that are useful are simple."
    - Mikhail Kalashnikov

  9. #329
    Hcl is cheaper than phosphoric acid, also - but that hcl is nasty stuff.

    Makes a passable weed-killer, or so I've heard.

    This, of course, presumes you can get phosphoric acid - it can take some doing. (I had to hunt for my jug) Its' advantages: much less flash-rust. Accidental spills / contact is a fair bit easier to deal with. 'Primes' steel surfaces - kind of like an impoverished-person's version of (?)por-15(?). Cons: cost, can be hard to find, - and still wants something in the way of protecive gear. Oh, a bit slower, too.
    Ouch! That stuff's hot!

  10. #330
    Quote Originally Posted by den View Post
    This, of course, presumes you can get phosphoric acid - it can take some doing. (I had to hunt for my jug) Its' advantages: much less flash-rust. Accidental spills / contact is a fair bit easier to deal with. 'Primes' steel surfaces - kind of like an impoverished-person's version of (?)por-15(?). Cons: cost, can be hard to find, - and still wants something in the way of protecive gear. Oh, a bit slower, too.
    The phosphoric acid can be found as concrete cleaner in big box stores. I think it's about $15 per gallon. I soaked a heavily rusted platform scale in 20 gallons of water with 3 gallons of acid for a week. Worked darn good. A slimy black coating is what remained of the rust, iron phosphate. I hosed the bulk of the slim off and wiped it down with rags. I sprayed primer over the residue that remained and then painted with enamel paint. Worked well.

    HCl acid is not allowed in my shop (my rules).

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