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Thread: Vilberts's newest toy

  1. #1
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    Vilberts's newest toy

    Well with the functional issues resolved on the mill, I guess I just needed something else in the queue.
    _35_zps3iafkvoo.jpg
    Sorry for the small pic. It's from the seller's ad and he pulled it down before I could grab the larger versions.

    Anyway it's a South Bend 10L or commonly known as the "heavy 10". I guess about one tenth the size of Justin's lathe at probably twice the cost...lol. This is the model lathe I was originally on the hunt for before I settled on the SB 9A. Heavy 10s are rare in my parts. I've seen only two pop up in as many years, and this is the only example I've seen with the cast iron base which I have a weak spot for.

    At any rate. It needs an extensive overhaul. A total tear down is mandatory unfortunately. The bed is worn pretty well. Pretty much a basket case honestly. On the upside I may just attempt a crash course on hand scraping for this project.

    Truth be told, my 9A served my purposes fine enough. The stand was a thorn in my side though. It's both flimsy and did nothing to control vibration. I had been brainstorming a new cabinet which would move the horizontal drive to underneath for space savings. The main motivation with this new to me machine was the headstock design. It accepts a 5C collet directly, which I just happen to have an abundance of. Not needing to purchase a 5C chuck was cost savings enough to warrant trying to rehab this machine.

    When I get it home I'll snap some better pics.

  2. #2
    Senior Member chubbyjp77's Avatar
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    Does it have the taper attachment? Gotta love a collet. Beats having the jaws hang out in the way.

  3. #3
    I have a 12 x 36 atlas, its not a SB but it does what i need, I'm in the process of making an ER40 Collet chuck for mine It will handle up to 1" and put up to 25/32 through the spindle.

    The Photo is of one that is on a 618 atlas for now i have a MT2/MT3 ERCollet set with 23 collets that i can use on my Mill Drill or the lathe spindle. It cost under 200.00 for all sizes from .115 to 1" including the MT head.
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    I always wanted a lathe.
    One day.

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    Quote Originally Posted by chubbyjp77 View Post
    Does it have the taper attachment? Gotta love a collet. Beats having the jaws hang out in the way.
    Yes it does... I did my best to hide that portion of my excitement while trying to talk the seller down...lol Funny enough, even with the taper attachment hanging out the back this "larger" machine takes up less space then my 9A with horizontal drive train.

    Quote Originally Posted by master53yoda View Post
    I have a 12 x 36 atlas, its not a SB but it does what i need, I'm in the process of making an ER40 Collet chuck for mine It will handle up to 1" and put up to 25/32 through the spindle.

    ERCollet set with 23 collets that i can use on my Mill Drill or the lathe spindle. It cost under 200.00 for all sizes from .115 to 1" including the MT head.
    This is my third metal lathe. I rebuilt an Atlas 618 that's waiting on a coat of paint. I'm currently using the SB 9A will continue doing so until I can clean up the 10L. Once the 10L is in useable condition I'll flip the 9A.

    I managed to pick up roughly 60 some odd hardinge 5C collets at an industrial auction for a mere $25 a few months ago. Having that stock pile made this 10L all the more appealing.

    This restoration (rebuild isn't the right word) will be a long one. I'm unsure if I can handle the bed reconditioning myself, and may have to farm it out for grinding. Either way it needs to happen before this machine makes chips again.

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    Sweet lathe. The greatest thing about scraping is that it goes slow, with heaps of checking and measuring, so you grow into it as you do it.
    Mark
    Last edited by rotarysmp; 01-24-2015 at 07:19 AM.

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    Senior Member chubbyjp77's Avatar
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    Scraping will actually provide a better surface for your carriage to ride on than will grinding. The level and camel back straight edge aren't cheap though. Having the ways shipped out for grinding isn't cheap either though. PracticalMachinist.com has some decent info on scraping ways. If you do decide to do it it would be great to see a thread about it. At least the thing isn't that long that you need to take the curvature of the earth into account to keep it straight.

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    Yes scraping is what you want on the ways,
    ground on ground ways wear very fast need the flaking to hold the oil for it to ride on.

    Heavy 10 is a decent lathe for it's class.
    It's kind of amazing how much a clapped out southebend will go for

  9. #9
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    Yes, a scraped surface is a better bearing surface than a ground one. Some people have a hard time wrapping their head around the idea that smoother isn't always better when you have mating surfaces that slide against one another.

    There is always the option of saving the labour of hand scraping down to a useful level by grinding. Then "frosting" the ground finish with scraping to provide a better bearing surface.

    The one aspect of hand scraping bed ways that I haven't been able to grasp is how to make both ways true to each other. Making one flat seems easy enough. Making both flat and running true seems like a whole different ball game.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by LSM View Post
    Heavy 10 is a decent lathe for it's class.
    It's kind of amazing how much a clapped out southebend will go for
    I personally believe that the next step up from a heavy ten is in the range of a Sheldon and then of course gear heads. Which is something I decided wasn't going to work based on my requirements. I'm not a SB fan boy by any means. Just suits my purposes the best from what I can tell.

    Down in the states I know you'll see heavy tens falling from the trees but its really a rare bird in my neck of the woods. The odds of finding another with the cast base and taper attachment isn't very likely.

    ...and yes, the crazy premium all hobby shop lathes have is amazing. South bend isn't alone in that regard although probably the front runner. Believe it or not but I was looking at a monarch c a couple weeks ago that has a >16" swing and 58" between centres for less than half the price of this heavy ten...lol. Not many people can move a 7000lbs machine. My problem was storing it until I would have a space to put it.

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