Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 19 of 19

Thread: My first and hopefully last steam explosion

  1. #11
    I guess it's stories like this that make me glad I have a dirt floor in my garage/workshop. I all my molds in or around the lowest spot of the floor near my foundry area, that way if any gets spilt on the ground it settles in what I call my "ingot overflow"
    I have also dug a few shallow ingot holes in the dirt, they end up full of dirt after a while, no trace of them left since I haven't made any ingots in a long time


    Ron
    If ya cant cast it, Forge it RSS

    http://metalmaster1766.webs.com/

  2. #12
    I learned my lesson the hard way.
    100_7398.jpg

  3. #13
    Senior Member Robert's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Charlotte, Nascarolina
    Posts
    2,924
    Quote Originally Posted by oceanic View Post
    I have concrete floors in my shop and I put down hardie panel sheets which is a concrete sheet material. It protects the floor nicely and it only leaves a mark it you pour more than shot glass worth of molten bronze on it. Slag doesnt even discolor it. It comes in 5/16" sheets and is light enough that you could lay it on the grass while you work and then put it away later.
    This stuff is a great idea. I wish I had used that to line my foundry area in retrospect. Not cheap though.
    R
    "Whether you think that you can, or that you can't, you are usually right."
    - Henry Ford (1863-1947)

    Forklift Project
    Sand Mixer

  4. #14
    Senior Member schnelle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Central Kansas
    Posts
    102
    It's was a lesson learned. Didn't have problems when I stacked on bricks. Will go back to that. Rather lose a brick than the rest of my patio. Will get pics up soon of the patio after removing all debris

  5. #15
    Banned
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Sydney Australia
    Posts
    941
    I have had this happen to me Numerous times, although no where near as big an event as that one. That must have gone off with some huge bang! I have done pieces the size of a tennis ball round and they were better than gunshots.
    I'm always wary of it now. E en the underside of my burners will get hot enough to spall the concrete and you can't always hear it or know whats going on as the pieces flying off are captive.
    The worst example I ever had of this was when I built my Aunt this monolithic Brick BBQ when I was in my '20s. I was a real bit of work with the BBQ one side and the incinerator the other with a common chimminey in the middle which was about 9 ft high and all done in brick. Took me a bunch of weekends to finish the thing and I went overboard on it for effect. Got this beautiful 1/2 steel plate and bricked it in and put doors on the thing for the wood storage.... definately one of my better DIY efforts in life.

    We used the thing maybe 3 times and it worked like a charm. Then at one family gathering with everyone around, the concrete in the fire section under the hotplate let go and damn near blew the plate right off. Cracked all the concrete around it holding it in and lifted the thing and bent it to a giddy angle. Luckily my cousin who was cooking had stepped away to dicipline the kids that kept running in front of the thing when it went off and no one caught any pieces. The bit that let loose was no where near as big as the piece shown in this example but it sure was powerful.

    I had lined the firebox area with a good thickness of concrete over the brick structure work and that was what let go. I was surprised it didn't go earlier but the moisture couldn't have been right.
    After that I had to get the plate out anyway so I spent more weekends smashing out the concrete lining I so carefully put in and put in another layer of bricks all on edge to give some protection to the structual ones. Made the firebox a bit smaller but when it was done I fired the thing up as hard as I could get it to go straight off and kept it hot as I could pretty much all day. It seemed fine after that and no more backyard bombs.
    For the other side I hacked out the concrete I put on the bottom and threw in some more bricks just sat there and that was ok then as well.

    I'm always careful to shield concrete from fire now. Brick dosen't go off like concrete so I always sit anything hot on a solid layer of brick and have a lot of thin steel sheets I can sit on bricks to shield the concrete from direct heat.
    Hebel ( aerated concrete) is also an excellent heat shield and won't spall or explode like regular Concrete.

  6. #16
    Senior Member schnelle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Central Kansas
    Posts
    102
    Been a long time since I posted. Im moving and have a big hole to patch. Anyone have any product suggestions on patching concrete?

  7. #17
    You can just get a bag of ready mix (quikrete etc.) but also pickup the Acrylic (sometimes called Plastic) bonding agent. Looks like a white milky liquid. you paint/pour it onto the old slab before you pour the new to bound them together. I would also chip up the slab area so it's nice and rough (bonus this gives you a clean surface as well). Pour, trowel, broom to match. (and if your moving... Your not going to be there if/when it pops the patch in 4-10 years )

    Good Luck,
    CBB

  8. #18
    Senior Member schnelle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Central Kansas
    Posts
    102
    my thoughts exactly. Just need it to look good enough for a month or two then Im good lol.

  9. #19
    Senior Member HT1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Jacksonville FL
    Posts
    1,250
    real foundries will have a sand floor covered with grating most of the time, or an all fire brick floor, but it still has to be kept dry.
    My shipboard foundry had firebrick with a 1/4 inch steel plate welded on top of it... the fire brick protected the space below us... if we had a big mold and placed it directly on the floor (huge NO GO) , I have seen the floor bow up 6 inches from the heat from the bottom of the mold


    V/r HT1

    P.S. thanks for the hint on the concrete board... good to know, I may have access to an industrial space and I would hate to mess up their floor

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •