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Thread: burns and injuries from your home foundry.

  1. #1
    Moderator DavidF's Avatar
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    burns and injuries from your home foundry.

    I am curious to hear how many injuries have been caused from your foundry work. The things I'm am looking to find are the types of injuries suffered, what the root cause of the accident was, and what you would do to keep it from happening again.
    I would also like to know what you use in every pour safety gear wise. Not what safety gear you have or wear only once in awhile. I know I don't all ways wear the proper ppe, but so far I have not in 7 years of casting hurt myself beyond a couple of blisters on my hands...
    A calm sea does not make a skilled sailor...
    http://thehomefoundry.org

  2. #2
    Excellent post. I have also been lucky to have sustained no injuries. Maybe a few sparks, but certainly nothing more than the kinds of burns you get from welding.

    With aluminum I am pretty lax. Face shield, steel toe boots and gloves. Always preheat your tools. Cold steel in molten aluminum will almost always cause a steam explosion.

    With cast iron, it is face shield, skull cap, welding shirt, leather apron, and welding gloves.

    My dad has had a couple of radiant burn injuries on his arms from iron. This was remedied by positioning himself on the end of the pouring shank rather than holding it across his body. I also got him some long insulated gloves that go up to his middle bicep.

    I think most safety is procedural. Prevent the accident...

  3. #3
    Moderator DavidF's Avatar
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    Ok, if you have not been injured or burnt I would like to hear that too, and what safety gear you used.
    I find the is all ways someone who has to make a comment about the lack of safety gear when casting metal on YouTube videos and just want to see if thier comments are justified by conducting a survey.
    I have to agree with IDS, most safety is derived from procedure.
    A calm sea does not make a skilled sailor...
    http://thehomefoundry.org

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    Whenever I pour I pull on US Army issue 100% cotton coveralls, a heavy leather apron, leather boots (and I made leather flaps to cover the laces), a plastic face shield, and welder's gloves—even when I'm doing a small pour with the #8 crucible half full..

    I gained respect for the heat the easy way. (No burns.) I was skimming the #30 crucible full of bronze and suddenly my thumb felt very hot. The heat had burned a hole in the thick leather welding glove. The handle of the skimmer was maybe 24 inches long. (Not long enough.) That experience gave me a profound respect for how much heat there is in a pot of metal. I welded extensions onto all of my skimmer handles.

    Richard
    When I die, Heaven can wait—I want to go to McMaster-Carr.

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    I'm as new as it gets but during my single session of pouring ingots I used steel toes with boat shields, face shield, 100% cotton flame retardant pants, and some high cut thermal resistant gloves that are a step down from those silver reflective type.

    I plan on adding a leather apron when I get brave and step up to iron pours.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Spelter's Avatar
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    Leather apron, heavy tinted safety glasses, kevlar gloves, long sleeves. Flatened out some fingerprints occasionally despruing too hot, but that's it. Thirty years with no health insurance makes a guy cautious. Back in my farming days I could have flipped a tractor and been pinned, been a couple of weeks 'til anyone looked for me. Fifteen years with an a3 crucible in bronze without incident.
    Last edited by Spelter; 06-25-2014 at 02:18 AM. Reason: Typo
    "The former lives of objects need not interfere with their current use."

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    Senior Member HT1's Avatar
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    I have never been hurt in my home foundry, I was burnt while I was in the Navy see this picture, note how there is a fellow holding two shovels over the first mold poured, this protects the hand of the person pouring, I had someone do a piss poor job, I had blisters all over the back of my right hand.

    I also inhaled a large dose of Chlorine gas when an Aluminum degassing tablet floated to the top of a melt of aluminum, I really thought I was going to die, I was choking and seeing spots (about to feint) before I got to fresh air

    V/r HT1


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    Moderator DavidF's Avatar
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    HT1, that was a radiant heat burn then??
    A calm sea does not make a skilled sailor...
    http://thehomefoundry.org

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    So far I haven't been burned with hot metal bad enough to write home to Mother about but I did have an interesting mishap when building an experimental furnace with some home brewed aerated concrete. I tried to increase the expansion rate by adding sone caustic soda to the mix before I added the water. Well, the result was more than I expected and the darned stuff overflowed the mold and went every where. I didn't have on the proper chemical resistant gloves and got a nasty caustic burn on one of my hands. It was worse than any heat burn I have ever experienced. Caustic soda is one nasty dude. Moral of this story, expect the unexpected and allow for any and all possibilities.
    learn from the mistakes of others, you'll never live long enough to make them all yourself

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    Quote Originally Posted by hobiejack View Post
    I didn't have on the proper chemical resistant gloves and got a nasty caustic burn on one of my hands. It was worse than any heat burn I have ever experienced. Caustic soda is one nasty dude. Moral of this story, expect the unexpected and allow for any and all possibilities.
    Reminds me of my one and only run in with caustic soda....

    I'm an industrial electrician by trade and was apart of a crew relocating an electro plating line. I was tasked with installing a run of PVC conduit through a section of the facility that used caustic soda for something or other. Well I'm on a ladder, gluing sections together, when I happened to bump my freshly opened bottle of pvc glue. It falls to the floor and starts rolling glugging glue everywhere. As quick as I can, I hope down the ladder and pick up the can. What I haven't mentioned yet was that my ladder was in a shallow catch basin used to contain the caustic soda used for some cleaning process. When I put the can back on the ladder and looked at my hand, I realized I had glued the residue soda to the inside of my bare hand.

    I can laugh now (and I am as I write this) but I was terrified when it happened. Only knowing the vague rumours of caustic soda I thought for sure my hand was about to melt off like I had just opened the lost ark. Maybe I was mislead to what the power was, or maybe pvc glue is a neutralizing agent for it, but I managed to get cleaned up without physical damage. Regardless, I never took off my work gloves again for the duration of that job...lol

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